Posts tagged occupywallstreet
tanya77:

shortformblog:

Some might see a crass corporate attempt to latch onto a movement that fits well with the company’s branding. We see a progressive company showing its pre-corporate roots. (via Percolate)

Why don’t these companies set up a job fair at each one of the Occupy sites?

So will Ben & Jerry’s put their money where their mouth is and hire the 99%? That’s the question. Related: We’ll go ahead and call it.  B&J’s should release a 99%-ers flavor of ice cream! Broken dreams, endless debt, and peanuts. Lots and lots of peanuts.

tanya77:

shortformblog:

Some might see a crass corporate attempt to latch onto a movement that fits well with the company’s branding. We see a progressive company showing its pre-corporate roots(via Percolate)

Why don’t these companies set up a job fair at each one of the Occupy sites?

So will Ben & Jerry’s put their money where their mouth is and hire the 99%? That’s the question. Related: We’ll go ahead and call it.  B&J’s should release a 99%-ers flavor of ice cream! Broken dreams, endless debt, and peanuts. Lots and lots of peanuts.

(via motherjones)

My Occupy Wall Street Reading List Thus Far (In No Particular Order)

sschlink:

These – just as examples – are all demands that virtually every supporter of the Occupy movement would endorse. Why not settle down, draw up a list of those demands, spell them out in enough detail so that there is no doubt of their meaning, figure out their budgetary implications, lay out a strategy for getting them adopted, and set about systematically developing a campaign around them?

Why not? Because that ends up playing the game, and the whole essence of the movement is to reject the game’s rules as it is being played, to produce change that includes each of these demands but goes much further to question the structures that make those demands necessary.

— From Occupy WallStreet – For What? For Whom? Where? Why? by Peter Marcuse, Professor of Urban Planning at Columbia University. (via @nitikp, @jacremes)

 

Going in to week four of the protests that started in New York City’s Zuccotti Park and have now spread across the country and the world to as many as 1,000 towns and cities, I thought I’d set down an updated version of my key readings about the movement thus far. I’ve also put together a pretty manageable Twitter list of people who I’m following (which is admittedly New York-centric). Would love more suggestions— both of Twitter accounts to follow AND articles/videos to consume. SSchlinkert [at] gmail or @reply me at @sts10.

 

— The Observer’s Adrianne Jeffries’ politely cynical early account of the camp and the movement.

Rosie Gray on Malik Rhasaan, his Twitter account @OccupyTheHood, and his mission to get more minorites involved. (I interviewed Malik earlier this week— great guy.)

— Again from Rosie, on the NYPD’s actions the night of Wednesday the 5th. ([Graphic] videos of scuffles between protesters and the police from that night via the official site.)

— NYTimes’ Kristof and Krugman weigh in, positively.

An extended version of Naomi Klein’s speech, delivered October 6th at Liberty Park, via the people’s mic. Also, Cornel West’s (Princeton) speech to the protesters, and Jeffrey Sachs (Columbia): video.

— VIDEO: A solid report from Al Jazeera English on the protests.

— John Schmitt on the how the movement’s weaknesses can be and are in fact strengths. (via @jacremes)

A complete, “blow-by-blow” history of the New York City occupation by New York Daily News writer Matthew DeLuca. 

— Scott Stringer, Manhattan Borough President, comes out in support of those occupying a park in his jurisdiction. 

— Ezra Klein on the laments of the 99%

— Tech: The Observer beats me to the punch with a guest post on the Zuccotti’s Internet working group, and later an explanation of why #occupywallst hasn’t been trending on Twitter. Here’s my take on the movement’s livestream crew and their gadgets

— On union solidarity: From the Beast, and the Voice on the official UAW endorsement.

— A first-hand account of the incident on the Brooklyn Bridge, including arrest and detention. 

— Glenn Greenwald for Salon on why the protester’s are angry: an early take.

— The movement “grows up”: The Times on Saturday’s peaceful, beautiful, and well-attended visit to Washington Square Park.

— The Times’ and art blog Hyperallergic on Saturday night’s No Comment art show, featuring the work of the OWS protesters. I’ll try to find some video (I know Monica and Hero took the livestream down there last night around 8:30 p.m.). 

— The Sunday Times Editorial (Oct 9):

At this point, protest is the message: income inequality is grinding down that middle class, increasing the ranks of the poor, and threatening to create a permanent underclass of able, willing but jobless people. On one level, the protesters, most of them young, are giving voice to a generation of lost opportunity.

The jobless rate for college graduates under age 25 has averaged 9.6 percent over the past year; for young high school graduates, the average is 21.6 percent. Those figures do not reflect graduates who are working but in low-paying jobs that do not even require diplomas. Such poor prospects in the early years of a career portend a lifetime of diminished prospects and lower earnings — the very definition of downward mobility.

— Also from the Sunday Times: how OWS fits in as a political movement, via the Tea Party and the New Left of the ’60s.

Issues 1 and 2 of the Occupy Wall Street Journal. The movement’s “official” site. Site of the New York General Assembly. The main livestream account, or all the occupy livestreams on one page.

Sam’s been keeping a close eye on #OWS, and put together this sericey link dump of various reads on the protests. He kinda buried his own piece, and we’ve been meaning to give it some tumblr love, so we’ll call it out right here: Check out this look at the Technology Propelling #OccupyWallStreet.

(Source: schlinkblog)

Herman Cain on #OccupyWallStreet: "If you don't have a job and you're not rich, blame yourself!"http://motherjones.com/mojo/2011/10/cain-occupywallstreet-if-youre-unemployed-blame-yourself

motherjones:

It’s like they’re not even pretending anymore.

Also important: Cain believes banks may have had “something to do with the crisis in 2008,” but hey, he says,  we’re not in 2008 anymore! “We’re in 2011! Okay?” No. That’s not OK.

There’s NYPD brass with guns on buses saying ‘Move the bus, this bus is now under the control of the NYPD. What room to protest is there? It’s not a transit supervisor you’re dealing with.
New York Transport Workers Union Local 100 President John Samuelsen • Discussing the way that the Brooklyn Bridge Occupy Wall Street arrests went down, particularly how the NYPD commandeered buses to arrest protesters en masse. The union is seeking injunctions (preliminary and permanent) against the NYPD to prevent them from doing this again. “The actions of the NYPD on Oct. 1, 2011, amounted to a seizure of the bus drivers,” the union’s lawyer, Arthur Schwartz, claimed in court. Will be curious to see how this goes. source (viafollow)

(Source: shortformblog)

thecamcorder:

newsweek:

A spokesperson for #occupywallstreet emails to confirm a Radiohead appearance happening later this afternoon.

Well that’s just asking for chaos. I hope they can pull it off, but really, I’m thinking people are going to be trampled.

Probably the thoughts going through the minds of NYC authorities at this very moment.

thecamcorder:

newsweek:

A spokesperson for #occupywallstreet emails to confirm a Radiohead appearance happening later this afternoon.

Well that’s just asking for chaos. I hope they can pull it off, but really, I’m thinking people are going to be trampled.

Probably the thoughts going through the minds of NYC authorities at this very moment.

A spokesperson for #occupywallstreet emails to confirm a Radiohead appearance happening later this afternoon.

A spokesperson for #occupywallstreet emails to confirm a Radiohead appearance happening later this afternoon.

What’s amazing about this photograph (by David Shankbone, Mr. Coolest Last Name Ever) is the ‘Charging Bull’ sculpture was initially installed without the consent of the authorities. It’s guerilla art!
The rest of the Occupy Wall St. photos from ‘In Focus’ are equally fascinating, go check ‘em out. (And hey! There’s a rumor Radiohead might be performing for the protesters at 4pm. Woah.)

What’s amazing about this photograph (by David Shankbone, Mr. Coolest Last Name Ever) is the ‘Charging Bull’ sculpture was initially installed without the consent of the authorities. It’s guerilla art!

The rest of the Occupy Wall St. photos from ‘In Focus’ are equally fascinating, go check ‘em out. (And hey! There’s a rumor Radiohead might be performing for the protesters at 4pm. Woah.)

Photographer “Jamie NYC” has a large gallery of scenes from the Occupy Wall Street protests, many depicting the scene last night. The cardboard signs are a particular treat, and something any Tea Party signage aficionado can truly appreciate. Cardboard signage knows no political bounds.

Photographer “Jamie NYC” has a large gallery of scenes from the Occupy Wall Street protests, many depicting the scene last night. The cardboard signs are a particular treat, and something any Tea Party signage aficionado can truly appreciate. Cardboard signage knows no political bounds.

In what may be the most documented arrests ever, at least five Wall Street protesters were detained on Tuesday to the chants of “what’s your name!,” “fucking cowards,” and the like. 

A spokesperson for the protesters writes via email:

The first arrest was a protester who objected to the police removing a tarp that was protecting our media equipment from the rain. The police said that the tarp constituted a tent, in spite of it not being a habitat in any way. Police continued pressuring protesters with extralegal tactics, saying that a protester on a bullhorn was breaking a law. The protester refused to cease exercising his first amendment rights and was also arrested. Then the police began to indiscriminately attempt to arrest protesters, many of them unsheathed their batons, in spite of the fact that the protest remained peaceful. One of the protesters received a large gash on their leg, another lost a tooth. Multiple police tackled a protester and sat on him as he continually warned them that he was experiencing an asthma attack. One of the medics on site informed the police that they needed to call an ambulance because this was a potentially fatal circumstance. They ignored him. We have no current information on this protester, but we hope that he hasn’t been murdered by the police.

One fascinating police tactic of note: the presence of officers with video cameras recording the arrests, likely to be used to defend against the inevitable accusations of brutality.

Videographer Eric Brown took his camera to Wall Street Saturday night to film the #occupywallstreet General Assembly. The result is this video, which features two hours of footage presented in slow motion clips “that celebrate and document the faces and feelings of September 17.” In his words:

I was curious to see how this event would play out, so I shot from 8pm to 10pm on September 17 at the General Assembly in Zuccotti Park. I was touched by the sense of community, and impressed by the level of cooperation and discipline among the occupiers. 

The police presence was large, but they seemed to be under orders not to escalate conflict. Both sides were respectful and non-confrontational. 

This is a group of passionate, concerned, and intelligent people. Their behavior in the park suggested a great appreciation of democracy, and a desire to cut through the clogged media and political channels to communicate a message they feel is incredibly important. 

This video contains nearly five minutes of raw slow-motion clips that celebrate and document the faces and feelings of September 17. 

I wanted to get this out within 24 hours of the shoot. Anyone who knows me will understand what a monumental power of will it took for me to leave this largely unedited. :)

[via Eric Brown’s Twitter]