Posts tagged ows

Central Bookinghttp://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/newsdesk/2011/11/central-booking.html?currentPage=all

longformorg:

A log of the 32 shitless hours that the author spent in the Tombs prison after being arrested during an Occupy Wall Street protest.

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A stat to tease you in: “Over the course of the thirty-two hours we were held at the Tombs, about twenty-five non-protesters cycled through our cell. It would have been more than that, but at a certain point there were so many protesters inside that new inmates were put in other cells. In any case, out of those twenty-five inmates on their way to hearings, just one was white. One was Asian. A few—maybe three or four—were Hispanic. The rest were black.”

(Source: longform)

Tumblr Tuesday: 5 Questions With Pepper Spraying Cop

We’re getting particularly zeitgeisty in this week’s Tumblr Tuesday, in which we virtually sit down with Brady, creator of the Pepper Spraying Cop Tumblr

Some background: Reactions to the UC Davis infamous pepper spray incident have been varied. Some commentators, including Megan Garber of the Nieman Journalism Lab, are saying the event, specifically the iconic video and images generated by cellphones and cameras, will be very valuable to the Occupy Movement at large. 

At UC Davis students held both a creepily silent protest aimed at Chancellor Katehi and a rally on Monday. Meanwhile the glorious internet has been busy creating a meme out of the image of pepper-spraying Lt. Pike (at least one such image made it to the UC Davis rally on Monday). Buzzfeed Editor Matt Stopera told NPR ”this is definitely going to be one of the bigger, more important memes.”

Brady Hall has launched a Tumblr collecting these images. We asked him 5 questions via email. 

1. Who or what gave you the initial idea to put the image of Lt. Pike in historical images?

I saw the photos and video of PSC when they first broke a few days ago and was just as disgusted as everybody else. I’ve been a supporter of the OWS movement and have moved my money into a credit union (the best and most tangible thing us average people can do!) so the actions of this guy were really shockingly terrible and somehow managed to outshine the previous top dog example of police brutality, namely the photo of 84 year old Dorli Rainey post-pepper spray. Suddenly last night (Sunday, November 20) I saw an image of PSC blasting the lady in Seurat’s famous painting [below] and knew a Tumblr was in order.

2. Are the images you’re getting mostly submissions or originals?

At this point it’s mostly submissions. I made the first one (Christina’s World) and the 2001, Guernica, Kent State and a few others. But when I roused myself from bed this morning I noticed a flood of submissions. I’m still going through them and queuing them.

3. What actions do you think should be taken at UC Davis after the incident? Do you think administrative leave is an adequate punishment for the UC Davis police chief?

I think that the people in charge at UC Davis should be fired or at the very least severely disciplined. The rank and file cops do not beat and pepper spray peaceful protesters unless there is either an order to do so or a lack of an order not to do so. In my mind either of those scenarios are equally inappropriate and especially in light of the constant stream of police brutality images in the past month. When people simply sit, and do nothing else, and do not threaten physically, they should not be subjected to this kind of treatment.

4. Which image so far is your favorite? Do you think any of them could become iconic images?

I hate to toot my own horn but the 2001 star child one makes me laugh out loud still. It’s that puny little arm trying so hard to hose down omnipotent Dave Bowman Baby.

5. What plans do you have going forward? Any other Tumblrs planned, specifically OWS-related?

I have no plans. I’ll just keep updating as long as there is interest. I am realistic and understand that crap like this has an amazingly short shelf life!



You can submit your own “proof of PSC pepper spraying somebody in history” to peppersprayingcop@yahoo.com.

Photographer Rick DeMint kindly writes, “Saw through your tumblr and twitter accounts for Newsweek that you’ve been doing a great job covering the Occupy movement and thought there might be some interest in using a photo I took at a recent rally in Denver. Not sensationalist, but I think it represents the movement well.” [Rick’s on tumblr.]

Photographer Rick DeMint kindly writes, “Saw through your tumblr and twitter accounts for Newsweek that you’ve been doing a great job covering the Occupy movement and thought there might be some interest in using a photo I took at a recent rally in Denver. Not sensationalist, but I think it represents the movement well.” [Rick’s on tumblr.]

Mayor Mike Bloomberg lands on the cover of this week’s Newsweek International, tied to our piece on his plan for “world domination.” [Insert snide remark related to said world domination about Zuccotti Park missteps here!]

Mayor Mike Bloomberg lands on the cover of this week’s Newsweek International, tied to our piece on his plan for “world domination.” [Insert snide remark related to said world domination about Zuccotti Park missteps here!]

thepoliticalnotebook:

The Wikipedia page for UC Davis’ Chancellor, Linda Katehi, has a message on it from the Occupy movement: 

You are unfit to ensure the safety of students at UC Davis. In fact: you are the primary threat to the safety of students at UC Davis. As such, I call upon you to resign immediately.

People are calling for her resignation after she ordered policemen onto the UC Davis campus to subdue student protesters. The police, in riot gear, pepper sprayed sitting protesters with linked arms, and then, as the protesters lay on the ground arrested some and pepper sprayed others again. Some had their mouths forced open and pepper spray sprayed directly down their throats (something that has fairly serious medical consequences).
Thanks to tumblr Really, Fox News? for bringing this to my attention.

thepoliticalnotebook:

The Wikipedia page for UC Davis’ Chancellor, Linda Katehi, has a message on it from the Occupy movement: 

You are unfit to ensure the safety of students at UC Davis. In fact: you are the primary threat to the safety of students at UC Davis. As such, I call upon you to resign immediately.

People are calling for her resignation after she ordered policemen onto the UC Davis campus to subdue student protesters. The police, in riot gear, pepper sprayed sitting protesters with linked arms, and then, as the protesters lay on the ground arrested some and pepper sprayed others again. Some had their mouths forced open and pepper spray sprayed directly down their throats (something that has fairly serious medical consequences).

Thanks to tumblr Really, Fox News? for bringing this to my attention.

(via joshsternberg)

buzzfeed:

crosscrowdedrooms:

It’s proved impossible for me to get this shot of former Philadelphia Police Cpt. Ray Lewis being arrested, published anywhere.  I was adamantly rebuffed by the Philadelphia Inquirer, NYT, local NY papers, and Newsweek, before even looking at the photograph.  One of the only published photos of this paradoxical and intense event is located here at the NYC Observer:
http://www.observer.com/2011/11/former-philadelphia-police-captain-ray-lewis-arrested-ows/

Glad this photo saw the light of day.

Adamantly rebuffed?! OK. Looks like we’re going to have to respond here.
Here’s John’s initial email to us (well, my gmail address, specifically):

As I’m sure you’ve heard, a former Philadelphia Police Cpt. Ray Lewis was arrested this morning, in his uniform, making for a unique, emotional, intense, and paradoxical moment.  I’m a freelance photojournalist and was able to get a few frames of this, and after arduous hours of attempting to get this photo published,  The Philadelphia Inquirer wouldn’t even consider looking at it, neither would the New York Times or a number of publications as I was told they already had photographers there, but obviously not had caught such an emotional scene.  Attached is a low res sequence of the actual arrest.  Would the prospect of this being published be of any interest to you?

Of course this would be of interest to us. We’ve been covering OWS all along. I thought these might be a good fit for the magazine, or the site, instead of just plopping on the Tumblr. So my response:

Great shots. I’ve sent to our photo editor, will let you know in the AM.

Earlier this morning, he writes back: 

I hope this finds you well sorry for the use of a different email. Thanks for the compliments and was wondering whether your photo editor had checked in with you yet about the photos I sent over late last night. All the best!

And then what? The Observer picked one of them up, great! But somehow Newsweek, big bad Newsweek, became one of those who “adamantly rebuffed” the photos “before even looking at the photograph.” Come on man. It’s a cool photo. No need to sully folks like us in the media to get the word out. Let the images you captured speak for themselves.
ZoomInfo
buzzfeed:

crosscrowdedrooms:

It’s proved impossible for me to get this shot of former Philadelphia Police Cpt. Ray Lewis being arrested, published anywhere.  I was adamantly rebuffed by the Philadelphia Inquirer, NYT, local NY papers, and Newsweek, before even looking at the photograph.  One of the only published photos of this paradoxical and intense event is located here at the NYC Observer:
http://www.observer.com/2011/11/former-philadelphia-police-captain-ray-lewis-arrested-ows/

Glad this photo saw the light of day.

Adamantly rebuffed?! OK. Looks like we’re going to have to respond here.
Here’s John’s initial email to us (well, my gmail address, specifically):

As I’m sure you’ve heard, a former Philadelphia Police Cpt. Ray Lewis was arrested this morning, in his uniform, making for a unique, emotional, intense, and paradoxical moment.  I’m a freelance photojournalist and was able to get a few frames of this, and after arduous hours of attempting to get this photo published,  The Philadelphia Inquirer wouldn’t even consider looking at it, neither would the New York Times or a number of publications as I was told they already had photographers there, but obviously not had caught such an emotional scene.  Attached is a low res sequence of the actual arrest.  Would the prospect of this being published be of any interest to you?

Of course this would be of interest to us. We’ve been covering OWS all along. I thought these might be a good fit for the magazine, or the site, instead of just plopping on the Tumblr. So my response:

Great shots. I’ve sent to our photo editor, will let you know in the AM.

Earlier this morning, he writes back: 

I hope this finds you well sorry for the use of a different email. Thanks for the compliments and was wondering whether your photo editor had checked in with you yet about the photos I sent over late last night. All the best!

And then what? The Observer picked one of them up, great! But somehow Newsweek, big bad Newsweek, became one of those who “adamantly rebuffed” the photos “before even looking at the photograph.” Come on man. It’s a cool photo. No need to sully folks like us in the media to get the word out. Let the images you captured speak for themselves.
ZoomInfo

buzzfeed:

crosscrowdedrooms:

It’s proved impossible for me to get this shot of former Philadelphia Police Cpt. Ray Lewis being arrested, published anywhere.  I was adamantly rebuffed by the Philadelphia Inquirer, NYT, local NY papers, and Newsweek, before even looking at the photograph.  One of the only published photos of this paradoxical and intense event is located here at the NYC Observer:

http://www.observer.com/2011/11/former-philadelphia-police-captain-ray-lewis-arrested-ows/

Glad this photo saw the light of day.

Adamantly rebuffed?! OK. Looks like we’re going to have to respond here.

Here’s John’s initial email to us (well, my gmail address, specifically):

As I’m sure you’ve heard, a former Philadelphia Police Cpt. Ray Lewis was arrested this morning, in his uniform, making for a unique, emotional, intense, and paradoxical moment.  I’m a freelance photojournalist and was able to get a few frames of this, and after arduous hours of attempting to get this photo published,  The Philadelphia Inquirer wouldn’t even consider looking at it, neither would the New York Times or a number of publications as I was told they already had photographers there, but obviously not had caught such an emotional scene.  Attached is a low res sequence of the actual arrest.  Would the prospect of this being published be of any interest to you?

Of course this would be of interest to us. We’ve been covering OWS all along. I thought these might be a good fit for the magazine, or the site, instead of just plopping on the Tumblr. So my response:

Great shots. I’ve sent to our photo editor, will let you know in the AM.

Earlier this morning, he writes back: 

I hope this finds you well sorry for the use of a different email. Thanks for the compliments and was wondering whether your photo editor had checked in with you yet about the photos I sent over late last night. All the best!

And then what? The Observer picked one of them up, great! But somehow Newsweek, big bad Newsweek, became one of those who “adamantly rebuffed” the photos “before even looking at the photograph.” Come on man. It’s a cool photo. No need to sully folks like us in the media to get the word out. Let the images you captured speak for themselves.

motherjones:

Law and order at #OWS. Near the New York Stock Exchange.
(Via @katz)

The spark for your Feminism & Protests thesis.

motherjones:

Law and order at #OWS. Near the New York Stock Exchange.

(Via @katz)

The spark for your Feminism & Protests thesis.

I drank six Four Lokos with Core, a beer or two. And then we ordered an iced mocha and two chicken fingers and large fries. I lost my virginity today. I was amped for it.
That’s Brandon Watts, 19, the protester whose bloodied head made waves on the Internet yesterday. He gave that quote to the Times in October.

theweekmagazine:

“I was there to take down the names of people who were arrested… As I’m standing there, some African-American woman goes up to a police officer and says, ‘I need to get in. My daughter’s there. I want to know if she’s OK.’ And he said, ‘Move on, lady.’ And they kept pushing with their sticks, pushing back. And she was crying. And all of a sudden, out of nowhere, he throws her to the ground and starts hitting her in the head,” says Smith. “I walk over, and I say, ‘Look, cuff her if she’s done something, but you don’t need to do that.’ And he said, ‘Lady, do you want to get arrested?’ And I said, ‘Do you see my hat? I’m here as a legal observer.’ He said, ‘You want to get arrested?’ And he pushed me up against the wall.”

Retired New York Supreme Court Judge Karen Smith, working as a legal observer after the raids on Zucotti Park this Tuesday, via Paramilitary Policing of Occupy Wall Street: Excessive Use of Force amidst the New Military Urbanism (via seriouslyamerica)

I mean, honestly! These kind of acts can’t be hidden anymore. There are more cameras than protesters, more observers than police, and the world, quite literally, is watching this all unfold.

Our reporter Michelle Goldberg, on the scene at #OWS this AM, captures a pretty killer quote from a young cop to a protester.

Occupier: “You should love these guys. Think of all the overtime.” 
NYPD: “I do love them. I lock up criminals, not protesters.”

Follow her.

Our reporter Michelle Goldberg, on the scene at #OWS this AM, captures a pretty killer quote from a young cop to a protester.

Occupier: “You should love these guys. Think of all the overtime.” 

NYPD: “I do love them. I lock up criminals, not protesters.”

Follow her.