Posts tagged photography
nationalpostphotos:

UKRAINE MEMORIAL:  A pair of boots placed as a memorial to an anti Yanakovych protestor killed in clashes with riot police last week on February 25, 2014 in Kiev, Ukraine. Ukraine’s interim President Olexander Turchynov is due to form a unity government, as UK and US foreign ministers meet to discuss emergency financial assistance for the country.  (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

nationalpostphotos:

UKRAINE MEMORIAL:  A pair of boots placed as a memorial to an anti Yanakovych protestor killed in clashes with riot police last week on February 25, 2014 in Kiev, Ukraine. Ukraine’s interim President Olexander Turchynov is due to form a unity government, as UK and US foreign ministers meet to discuss emergency financial assistance for the country.  (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

(via washingtonpost)

In her latest project “Our House Is on Fire,” Iranian artist Shirin Neshat examines the brutal aftermath of the failed Egyptian revolution by overlaying photos of the victims with poetic text. 

The project, on display in New York City starting Jan. 31, will also help some of those victimized by the revolution: The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, a humanitarian arts organization, commissioned Neshat to create the series and as part of the arrangement, proceeds from some works will be donated to charities in Egypt. (SEE Shirin Neshat’s Photos of the Egyptian Revolution)

In her latest project “Our House Is on Fire,” Iranian artist Shirin Neshat examines the brutal aftermath of the failed Egyptian revolution by overlaying photos of the victims with poetic text.

The project, on display in New York City starting Jan. 31, will also help some of those victimized by the revolution: The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, a humanitarian arts organization, commissioned Neshat to create the series and as part of the arrangement, proceeds from some works will be donated to charities in Egypt. (SEE Shirin Neshat’s Photos of the Egyptian Revolution)

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Death in Cairoby Yusuf Sayman 
On July 5, I was standing outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo where many Egyptians believed their recently ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, was being held. Military troops in fatigues guarded the entrance, blocked off from the street by a barbed wire fence. On the other side of the road, thousands of Morsi’s supporters were massed.
Two days earlier, when Morsi was still technically Egypt’s president, I had photographed an earlier protest at this very spot. But it had been a vastly different scene—with anti-Morsi demonstrators calling for Morsi’s ouster just hours before Egypt’s army chief went on television and announced that he’d removed Morsi from office. There were no armed personnel carriers at the entrance, no barbed wire. Just a couple of soldiers standing around chatting. When an officer stepped forward to urge the crowd not to get too close to the gate, they cheered.
But now, the crowd was hostile—and growing. Morsi’s supporters chanted angrily against the army as men at the front of the protest tried to keep enraged colleagues from crossing the road, fearing it might provoke a violent response. As two colleagues and I approached the barbed wire, the soldiers warned us to leave. One officer then made an announcement: “Do not cross the street, or force will be used.”
Soon after, a lone protester pushed through the chaos and began to cross. His name was Mohamed Sobhi, an engineer born in 1977, wearing a long beard, sunglasses, a grey t-shirt and khaki pants. In his hand, he held a poster of Morsi. It was obvious that he planned to hang it on the wire. He came close, but then, just after 3pm, I heard a lone gun shot. Sobhi dropped to the floor, felled by a bullet to the head, and the first demonstrator to be killed by the army in Egypt’s ongoing crisis lay bleeding in the street.
These photos show that moment.

A terrible—but important—moment captured by photographer Yusuf Sayman in Egypt during the recent protests. Warning: this is very graphic.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Death in Cairoby Yusuf Sayman 
On July 5, I was standing outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo where many Egyptians believed their recently ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, was being held. Military troops in fatigues guarded the entrance, blocked off from the street by a barbed wire fence. On the other side of the road, thousands of Morsi’s supporters were massed.
Two days earlier, when Morsi was still technically Egypt’s president, I had photographed an earlier protest at this very spot. But it had been a vastly different scene—with anti-Morsi demonstrators calling for Morsi’s ouster just hours before Egypt’s army chief went on television and announced that he’d removed Morsi from office. There were no armed personnel carriers at the entrance, no barbed wire. Just a couple of soldiers standing around chatting. When an officer stepped forward to urge the crowd not to get too close to the gate, they cheered.
But now, the crowd was hostile—and growing. Morsi’s supporters chanted angrily against the army as men at the front of the protest tried to keep enraged colleagues from crossing the road, fearing it might provoke a violent response. As two colleagues and I approached the barbed wire, the soldiers warned us to leave. One officer then made an announcement: “Do not cross the street, or force will be used.”
Soon after, a lone protester pushed through the chaos and began to cross. His name was Mohamed Sobhi, an engineer born in 1977, wearing a long beard, sunglasses, a grey t-shirt and khaki pants. In his hand, he held a poster of Morsi. It was obvious that he planned to hang it on the wire. He came close, but then, just after 3pm, I heard a lone gun shot. Sobhi dropped to the floor, felled by a bullet to the head, and the first demonstrator to be killed by the army in Egypt’s ongoing crisis lay bleeding in the street.
These photos show that moment.

A terrible—but important—moment captured by photographer Yusuf Sayman in Egypt during the recent protests. Warning: this is very graphic.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Death in Cairoby Yusuf Sayman 
On July 5, I was standing outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo where many Egyptians believed their recently ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, was being held. Military troops in fatigues guarded the entrance, blocked off from the street by a barbed wire fence. On the other side of the road, thousands of Morsi’s supporters were massed.
Two days earlier, when Morsi was still technically Egypt’s president, I had photographed an earlier protest at this very spot. But it had been a vastly different scene—with anti-Morsi demonstrators calling for Morsi’s ouster just hours before Egypt’s army chief went on television and announced that he’d removed Morsi from office. There were no armed personnel carriers at the entrance, no barbed wire. Just a couple of soldiers standing around chatting. When an officer stepped forward to urge the crowd not to get too close to the gate, they cheered.
But now, the crowd was hostile—and growing. Morsi’s supporters chanted angrily against the army as men at the front of the protest tried to keep enraged colleagues from crossing the road, fearing it might provoke a violent response. As two colleagues and I approached the barbed wire, the soldiers warned us to leave. One officer then made an announcement: “Do not cross the street, or force will be used.”
Soon after, a lone protester pushed through the chaos and began to cross. His name was Mohamed Sobhi, an engineer born in 1977, wearing a long beard, sunglasses, a grey t-shirt and khaki pants. In his hand, he held a poster of Morsi. It was obvious that he planned to hang it on the wire. He came close, but then, just after 3pm, I heard a lone gun shot. Sobhi dropped to the floor, felled by a bullet to the head, and the first demonstrator to be killed by the army in Egypt’s ongoing crisis lay bleeding in the street.
These photos show that moment.

A terrible—but important—moment captured by photographer Yusuf Sayman in Egypt during the recent protests. Warning: this is very graphic.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Death in Cairoby Yusuf Sayman 
On July 5, I was standing outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo where many Egyptians believed their recently ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, was being held. Military troops in fatigues guarded the entrance, blocked off from the street by a barbed wire fence. On the other side of the road, thousands of Morsi’s supporters were massed.
Two days earlier, when Morsi was still technically Egypt’s president, I had photographed an earlier protest at this very spot. But it had been a vastly different scene—with anti-Morsi demonstrators calling for Morsi’s ouster just hours before Egypt’s army chief went on television and announced that he’d removed Morsi from office. There were no armed personnel carriers at the entrance, no barbed wire. Just a couple of soldiers standing around chatting. When an officer stepped forward to urge the crowd not to get too close to the gate, they cheered.
But now, the crowd was hostile—and growing. Morsi’s supporters chanted angrily against the army as men at the front of the protest tried to keep enraged colleagues from crossing the road, fearing it might provoke a violent response. As two colleagues and I approached the barbed wire, the soldiers warned us to leave. One officer then made an announcement: “Do not cross the street, or force will be used.”
Soon after, a lone protester pushed through the chaos and began to cross. His name was Mohamed Sobhi, an engineer born in 1977, wearing a long beard, sunglasses, a grey t-shirt and khaki pants. In his hand, he held a poster of Morsi. It was obvious that he planned to hang it on the wire. He came close, but then, just after 3pm, I heard a lone gun shot. Sobhi dropped to the floor, felled by a bullet to the head, and the first demonstrator to be killed by the army in Egypt’s ongoing crisis lay bleeding in the street.
These photos show that moment.

A terrible—but important—moment captured by photographer Yusuf Sayman in Egypt during the recent protests. Warning: this is very graphic.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Death in Cairoby Yusuf Sayman 
On July 5, I was standing outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo where many Egyptians believed their recently ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, was being held. Military troops in fatigues guarded the entrance, blocked off from the street by a barbed wire fence. On the other side of the road, thousands of Morsi’s supporters were massed.
Two days earlier, when Morsi was still technically Egypt’s president, I had photographed an earlier protest at this very spot. But it had been a vastly different scene—with anti-Morsi demonstrators calling for Morsi’s ouster just hours before Egypt’s army chief went on television and announced that he’d removed Morsi from office. There were no armed personnel carriers at the entrance, no barbed wire. Just a couple of soldiers standing around chatting. When an officer stepped forward to urge the crowd not to get too close to the gate, they cheered.
But now, the crowd was hostile—and growing. Morsi’s supporters chanted angrily against the army as men at the front of the protest tried to keep enraged colleagues from crossing the road, fearing it might provoke a violent response. As two colleagues and I approached the barbed wire, the soldiers warned us to leave. One officer then made an announcement: “Do not cross the street, or force will be used.”
Soon after, a lone protester pushed through the chaos and began to cross. His name was Mohamed Sobhi, an engineer born in 1977, wearing a long beard, sunglasses, a grey t-shirt and khaki pants. In his hand, he held a poster of Morsi. It was obvious that he planned to hang it on the wire. He came close, but then, just after 3pm, I heard a lone gun shot. Sobhi dropped to the floor, felled by a bullet to the head, and the first demonstrator to be killed by the army in Egypt’s ongoing crisis lay bleeding in the street.
These photos show that moment.

A terrible—but important—moment captured by photographer Yusuf Sayman in Egypt during the recent protests. Warning: this is very graphic.
ZoomInfo

picturedept:

Death in Cairo
by Yusuf Sayman 

On July 5, I was standing outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo where many Egyptians believed their recently ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, was being held. Military troops in fatigues guarded the entrance, blocked off from the street by a barbed wire fence. On the other side of the road, thousands of Morsi’s supporters were massed.

Two days earlier, when Morsi was still technically Egypt’s president, I had photographed an earlier protest at this very spot. But it had been a vastly different scene—with anti-Morsi demonstrators calling for Morsi’s ouster just hours before Egypt’s army chief went on television and announced that he’d removed Morsi from office. There were no armed personnel carriers at the entrance, no barbed wire. Just a couple of soldiers standing around chatting. When an officer stepped forward to urge the crowd not to get too close to the gate, they cheered.

But now, the crowd was hostile—and growing. Morsi’s supporters chanted angrily against the army as men at the front of the protest tried to keep enraged colleagues from crossing the road, fearing it might provoke a violent response. As two colleagues and I approached the barbed wire, the soldiers warned us to leave. One officer then made an announcement: “Do not cross the street, or force will be used.”

Soon after, a lone protester pushed through the chaos and began to cross. His name was Mohamed Sobhi, an engineer born in 1977, wearing a long beard, sunglasses, a grey t-shirt and khaki pants. In his hand, he held a poster of Morsi. It was obvious that he planned to hang it on the wire. He came close, but then, just after 3pm, I heard a lone gun shot. Sobhi dropped to the floor, felled by a bullet to the head, and the first demonstrator to be killed by the army in Egypt’s ongoing crisis lay bleeding in the street.

These photos show that moment.

A terrible—but important—moment captured by photographer Yusuf Sayman in Egypt during the recent protests. Warning: this is very graphic.

picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 
Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.
ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.
ZoomInfo

picturedept:

Like many new mothers, former Daily Beast contributor and professional photographer Rachel Hulin started photographing her son Henry from the moment he was born.  When Hulin discovered that Henry took great delight in being held and ‘flown’, she started shooting his aerial adventures…and soon the photo project “Flying Henry" was born. 

Hulin’s technique requires impeccable timing and some post-production tricks. From ClampArt:

…she would anchor the camera to a tripod and shoot pictures on a timer while she held the infant overhead. Other times her husband would stand in to elevate their son. The sessions were typically just five frames in duration before Henry lost interest. Then, back at the computer, Hulin digitally eliminated the adults in the images making it appear as though Henry were in magical flight. 

While the beautiful photographs evoke a quiet magic, they loudly remind us of the power of discovering the world for the first time.

ClampArt will be hosting Hulin’s first New York solo show, from July 25 – September 7, 2013. The book “Flying Henry”, published by powerHouse Books is on sale now.

So rad. Man, we want to fly.

picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
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In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo

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In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.

In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”

Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.

The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.

The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.

“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”

The fashion spreads in VICE magazine are always unconventional and approached with an art editorial point-of-view rather than a typical fashion photo-editorial one. Our main goal is to create artful images, with the fashion message following, rather than leading. ‘Last Words’ was created in this tradition and focused on the demise of a set of writers whose lives we very much wish weren’t cut tragically short, especially at their own hands. We will no longer display ‘Last Words’ on our website and apologize to anyone who was hurt or offended.
We think VICE is saying they are sorry for that photo gallery depicting famous female writers at the moment of their suicide, although this reads more like a “sorry you were offended” apology.
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From Every Angle: The Street Photography of Hiroyuki Ito
The Daily Beast asked the New York-based photographer Hiroyuki Ito to explore the city with a Holga – the inexpensive, yet iconic, plastic film camera that produces wonderful, nostalgic-looking images that Instagram can only mimic. 
See Ito’s photographs here.

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From Every Angle: The Street Photography of Hiroyuki Ito

The Daily Beast asked the New York-based photographer Hiroyuki Ito to explore the city with a Holga – the inexpensive, yet iconic, plastic film camera that produces wonderful, nostalgic-looking images that Instagram can only mimic. 

See Ito’s photographs here.

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Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
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picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.
From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.
Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.
ZoomInfo

picturedept:

Everyday there are lives at home and on the other side of the world that go unnoticed; lives that may matter little to the personal hustle of trying to pay rent, get children to do their homework or figure out how late to leave the couch and still make it to work on time; but everyday photojournalists celebrate these lives.

From children playing while 1,034-plus bodies are pulled from the rubble of a clothing factory in Savar where shirts are sewn for wealthy westerners, to the tattered remains of an American flag on a still ravaged New Jersey coast line on the six month anniversary of Hurricane Sandy; these documentary images take us beyond a scrolling news flash on the bottom of a cable news show and ask us to look. To look and if we stop long enough to force us to stare for a moment; to question why.

Click though to The Daily Beast to see all the images for the week in pictures.

Artists invited the inmates at Illinois’s Tamms supermax prison to request one image of anything in the world, real or imagined—and then they photographed it. Like this photograph of a prisoner’s aunt’s house. 

Artists invited the inmates at Illinois’s Tamms supermax prison to request one image of anything in the world, real or imagined—and then they photographed it. Like this photograph of a prisoner’s aunt’s house.