Posts tagged robots
About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products. 

Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce. Like the giant monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this new head of lettuce is simultaneously a product of this factory’s past and the future. 

Fujitsu is a space-age R&D innovator with sprawling, specialized factories. But several of its facilities, including this one, went dark when the company tightened its belt and reorganized its product lines after the 2008 global financial crisis. Now in the aftermath, it has retrofitted this facilities to serve tomorrow’s vegetable consumers, who will pay for a better-than-organic product, and who enjoy a bowl of iceberg more if they know it was monitored by thousands of little sensors. 

The Internet Of Things Meets Hydroponics: How To Grow A Better Vegetable

About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products.

Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce. Like the giant monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this new head of lettuce is simultaneously a product of this factory’s past and the future.

Fujitsu is a space-age R&D innovator with sprawling, specialized factories. But several of its facilities, including this one, went dark when the company tightened its belt and reorganized its product lines after the 2008 global financial crisis. Now in the aftermath, it has retrofitted this facilities to serve tomorrow’s vegetable consumers, who will pay for a better-than-organic product, and who enjoy a bowl of iceberg more if they know it was monitored by thousands of little sensors.

The Internet Of Things Meets Hydroponics: How To Grow A Better Vegetable

If all goes according to plan, grandparents will soon be lawn bowling with robots. The elder care industry has recently struggled to keep pace with the swelling numbers of retiring Boomers, and the problem is expected to reach crisis levels within the coming years. 

With hopes of averting a disaster, techno-futurists are at work designing the best robotic caretakers possible. 

The machines have already been introduced on a wider scale in Japan, where the government has funneled billions of yen into the production of custodial robots capable of leading older folks around elderly facilities, “assisting with their toilet needs,” and locating the bold geriatrics who decide to walk off the premises. 

But there appears to be at least one major blind spot in the sci-fi master plan. Senior citizens in the United States are surprisingly not overly concerned about the effects the robots will have on themselves, according to the results of a recent survey of 640 retirees above the age of 60 (average age was 68) published as part of the proceedings of the Association for Computer Machinery’s CHI conference. 

They are instead worried about how the machines might affect younger generations, like their children and grandchildren. People frequently subscribe to the notion that they will not suffer from the effects of a certain form of media or technology but are certain that it will have a negative effect on others. 

This phenomenon is known as the “third-person effect.” “The greatest negative effects are predicted to occur among imagined audiences that are socially distant from the individual’s own reference group,” the Pennsylvania State University media researchers explain in their paper. “For the population of interest in this study, namely senior citizens, the obvious ‘other’ group is younger people.” 

Elderly Fear Their Future Robot Friends Will Corrupt Children - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

If all goes according to plan, grandparents will soon be lawn bowling with robots. The elder care industry has recently struggled to keep pace with the swelling numbers of retiring Boomers, and the problem is expected to reach crisis levels within the coming years.

With hopes of averting a disaster, techno-futurists are at work designing the best robotic caretakers possible.

The machines have already been introduced on a wider scale in Japan, where the government has funneled billions of yen into the production of custodial robots capable of leading older folks around elderly facilities, “assisting with their toilet needs,” and locating the bold geriatrics who decide to walk off the premises.

But there appears to be at least one major blind spot in the sci-fi master plan. Senior citizens in the United States are surprisingly not overly concerned about the effects the robots will have on themselves, according to the results of a recent survey of 640 retirees above the age of 60 (average age was 68) published as part of the proceedings of the Association for Computer Machinery’s CHI conference.

They are instead worried about how the machines might affect younger generations, like their children and grandchildren. People frequently subscribe to the notion that they will not suffer from the effects of a certain form of media or technology but are certain that it will have a negative effect on others.

This phenomenon is known as the “third-person effect.” “The greatest negative effects are predicted to occur among imagined audiences that are socially distant from the individual’s own reference group,” the Pennsylvania State University media researchers explain in their paper. “For the population of interest in this study, namely senior citizens, the obvious ‘other’ group is younger people.”

Elderly Fear Their Future Robot Friends Will Corrupt Children - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

Los Angeles artist Steve Talkowski of Sketchbot Studios Inc. has created a collection of 3D models featuring cute robots in real world situations.
He also rendered a robot version of the well-meaning demon superhero Hellboy.
Steve made the collection of original character designs for artist Dacosta Bayley‘s daily March of Robots” sketch challenge, which has recently become an artbook. You can view more of Steve’s robots on Behance.
3D Models of Cute Robots in Real World Situations [Click through to LaughingSquid for links to everything, including Steve’s portfolio.] 

Los Angeles artist Steve Talkowski of Sketchbot Studios Inc. has created a collection of 3D models featuring cute robots in real world situations.

He also rendered a robot version of the well-meaning demon superhero Hellboy.

Steve made the collection of original character designs for artist Dacosta Bayley‘s daily March of Robots” sketch challenge, which has recently become an artbook. You can view more of Steve’s robots on Behance.

3D Models of Cute Robots in Real World Situations [Click through to LaughingSquid for links to everything, including Steve’s portfolio.] 

The Olympics are meant to test human ability. But technology is now augmenting what humans can do, allowing them to cut through water faster and run on prosthetic legs at speeds faster than athletes who have legs. 

The Olympic committee has often reacted by banning equipment and clothing that give athletes too much of an advantage. A new Swiss competition called the Cybathlon, scheduled for 2016, sets aside those limits and asks what athletes with physical disabilities are capable of when they compete with the help of advanced robotics. 

Their abilities will be tested in six different competitions that range from completing a course in an exoskeleton to racing virtual cars via a computer-brain interface. Athletes will compete individually or in teams and pair with a lab that will create their robotics gear. 

Humans and robots will come together to compete in the 2016 Cybathalon

The Olympics are meant to test human ability. But technology is now augmenting what humans can do, allowing them to cut through water faster and run on prosthetic legs at speeds faster than athletes who have legs.

The Olympic committee has often reacted by banning equipment and clothing that give athletes too much of an advantage. A new Swiss competition called the Cybathlon, scheduled for 2016, sets aside those limits and asks what athletes with physical disabilities are capable of when they compete with the help of advanced robotics.

Their abilities will be tested in six different competitions that range from completing a course in an exoskeleton to racing virtual cars via a computer-brain interface. Athletes will compete individually or in teams and pair with a lab that will create their robotics gear.

Humans and robots will come together to compete in the 2016 Cybathalon

twicr:

Flopsy robot is flopsy.

Pretty sure I’ve dreamt about this thing. You guys were there too. We should run.

(Source: spectrum.ieee.org)