Posts tagged science
I understand the emotional pull of getting together for a race to raise money. I understand the need to raise awareness. Many of our members wear pink ribbons; I respect that. The question is, what are we raising awareness of? Where is the money going? What is it accomplishing?
Fran Visco, president of the National Breast Cancer Coalition (which has hundreds of organizations and thousands of individual activists focused on fighting cancer), says money raised for breast cancer should be given to science—specifically, through studying how the cancer develops and metastasizes—and not to give every woman a mammogram. We could screen every woman in the world and we would not have stopped breast cancer,” she adds. “I am not saying to stop funding for screening; however, we cannot afford to make it a main focus.”
discoverynews:

Suicide by Roller Coaster
This is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster,  engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a  human being.

The 3-minute ride involves a long, slow, climb — nearly a third of a  mile long — that lifts one up to a height of more than 1,600 feet,  followed by a massive fall and seven strategically sized and placed  loops. The final descent and series of loops take all of one minute. But  the 10g force from the spinning loops at 223 mph in that single minute  is lethal.

More

This is nuts. The creator, Designer/Artist Julijonas Urbonas, tells Discovery he doesn’t see his suicide machine as being about death, but as “an intellectual and artful departure from the  world.”

discoverynews:

Suicide by Roller Coaster

This is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being.

The 3-minute ride involves a long, slow, climb — nearly a third of a mile long — that lifts one up to a height of more than 1,600 feet, followed by a massive fall and seven strategically sized and placed loops. The final descent and series of loops take all of one minute. But the 10g force from the spinning loops at 223 mph in that single minute is lethal.

More

This is nuts. The creator, Designer/Artist Julijonas Urbonas, tells Discovery he doesn’t see his suicide machine as being about death, but as “an intellectual and artful departure from the world.”

futurejournalismproject:

A new app from Science Photo Library puts images of the world’s creepy crawlers a mere finger swipe away.
Over 550 insects have been photographed but this isn’t being done with typical microscopes. Instead, electron beams are fired at the critters and images are formed from them.
Via Wired UK (Emphasis ours):

Speaking to Wired.co.uk, Gary Evans and Simon Stone from the SPL explained behind the images: “In the past magnified photos have been taken through microscopes. However there have been problems with the light quality and sharpness of these images. With SEM [Scanning Electron Microscope] technology, an electron beam is fired at a subject and what is reflected back off it forms an image. You can get incredible magnifications from this process.”
The insects were dead before being coated in gold to prevent static and then put in a vacuum before undergoing SEM imaging at the hands of electron microscopist Steve Gschmeissner. The resultant photos, for example of a fly’s eye, allow viewers to magnify an image up to 1,000x larger than in reality.

The Mini Monsters Gallery App is available September 12 via iTunes.

They said “electron beams are fired at the critters”! File that in phrases I never expected to read until the year 2057.
ZoomInfo
futurejournalismproject:

A new app from Science Photo Library puts images of the world’s creepy crawlers a mere finger swipe away.
Over 550 insects have been photographed but this isn’t being done with typical microscopes. Instead, electron beams are fired at the critters and images are formed from them.
Via Wired UK (Emphasis ours):

Speaking to Wired.co.uk, Gary Evans and Simon Stone from the SPL explained behind the images: “In the past magnified photos have been taken through microscopes. However there have been problems with the light quality and sharpness of these images. With SEM [Scanning Electron Microscope] technology, an electron beam is fired at a subject and what is reflected back off it forms an image. You can get incredible magnifications from this process.”
The insects were dead before being coated in gold to prevent static and then put in a vacuum before undergoing SEM imaging at the hands of electron microscopist Steve Gschmeissner. The resultant photos, for example of a fly’s eye, allow viewers to magnify an image up to 1,000x larger than in reality.

The Mini Monsters Gallery App is available September 12 via iTunes.

They said “electron beams are fired at the critters”! File that in phrases I never expected to read until the year 2057.
ZoomInfo
futurejournalismproject:

A new app from Science Photo Library puts images of the world’s creepy crawlers a mere finger swipe away.
Over 550 insects have been photographed but this isn’t being done with typical microscopes. Instead, electron beams are fired at the critters and images are formed from them.
Via Wired UK (Emphasis ours):

Speaking to Wired.co.uk, Gary Evans and Simon Stone from the SPL explained behind the images: “In the past magnified photos have been taken through microscopes. However there have been problems with the light quality and sharpness of these images. With SEM [Scanning Electron Microscope] technology, an electron beam is fired at a subject and what is reflected back off it forms an image. You can get incredible magnifications from this process.”
The insects were dead before being coated in gold to prevent static and then put in a vacuum before undergoing SEM imaging at the hands of electron microscopist Steve Gschmeissner. The resultant photos, for example of a fly’s eye, allow viewers to magnify an image up to 1,000x larger than in reality.

The Mini Monsters Gallery App is available September 12 via iTunes.

They said “electron beams are fired at the critters”! File that in phrases I never expected to read until the year 2057.
ZoomInfo
futurejournalismproject:

A new app from Science Photo Library puts images of the world’s creepy crawlers a mere finger swipe away.
Over 550 insects have been photographed but this isn’t being done with typical microscopes. Instead, electron beams are fired at the critters and images are formed from them.
Via Wired UK (Emphasis ours):

Speaking to Wired.co.uk, Gary Evans and Simon Stone from the SPL explained behind the images: “In the past magnified photos have been taken through microscopes. However there have been problems with the light quality and sharpness of these images. With SEM [Scanning Electron Microscope] technology, an electron beam is fired at a subject and what is reflected back off it forms an image. You can get incredible magnifications from this process.”
The insects were dead before being coated in gold to prevent static and then put in a vacuum before undergoing SEM imaging at the hands of electron microscopist Steve Gschmeissner. The resultant photos, for example of a fly’s eye, allow viewers to magnify an image up to 1,000x larger than in reality.

The Mini Monsters Gallery App is available September 12 via iTunes.

They said “electron beams are fired at the critters”! File that in phrases I never expected to read until the year 2057.
ZoomInfo
futurejournalismproject:

A new app from Science Photo Library puts images of the world’s creepy crawlers a mere finger swipe away.
Over 550 insects have been photographed but this isn’t being done with typical microscopes. Instead, electron beams are fired at the critters and images are formed from them.
Via Wired UK (Emphasis ours):

Speaking to Wired.co.uk, Gary Evans and Simon Stone from the SPL explained behind the images: “In the past magnified photos have been taken through microscopes. However there have been problems with the light quality and sharpness of these images. With SEM [Scanning Electron Microscope] technology, an electron beam is fired at a subject and what is reflected back off it forms an image. You can get incredible magnifications from this process.”
The insects were dead before being coated in gold to prevent static and then put in a vacuum before undergoing SEM imaging at the hands of electron microscopist Steve Gschmeissner. The resultant photos, for example of a fly’s eye, allow viewers to magnify an image up to 1,000x larger than in reality.

The Mini Monsters Gallery App is available September 12 via iTunes.

They said “electron beams are fired at the critters”! File that in phrases I never expected to read until the year 2057.
ZoomInfo

futurejournalismproject:

A new app from Science Photo Library puts images of the world’s creepy crawlers a mere finger swipe away.

Over 550 insects have been photographed but this isn’t being done with typical microscopes. Instead, electron beams are fired at the critters and images are formed from them.

Via Wired UK (Emphasis ours):

Speaking to Wired.co.uk, Gary Evans and Simon Stone from the SPL explained behind the images: “In the past magnified photos have been taken through microscopes. However there have been problems with the light quality and sharpness of these images. With SEM [Scanning Electron Microscope] technology, an electron beam is fired at a subject and what is reflected back off it forms an image. You can get incredible magnifications from this process.”

The insects were dead before being coated in gold to prevent static and then put in a vacuum before undergoing SEM imaging at the hands of electron microscopist Steve Gschmeissner. The resultant photos, for example of a fly’s eye, allow viewers to magnify an image up to 1,000x larger than in reality.

The Mini Monsters Gallery App is available September 12 via iTunes.

They said “electron beams are fired at the critters”! File that in phrases I never expected to read until the year 2057.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

A full-blown nuclear meltdown would be devastating for pregnant women and their fetuses, which are particularly vulnerable to the lasting effects of radiation. Should the worst-case scenario become a reality, it could lead to a generation of children born with all manner of maladies, from congenital malformation to mental retardation.
The Twitterization of our culture has revolutionized our lives, but with an unintended consequence—our overloaded brains freeze when we have to make decisions.
From this week’s cover of NEWSWEEK: Sharon Begley on the science of decision-making
Christine O’Donnell [may have] crusaded against masturbation in the mid-1990s, denouncing it as “toying” with the organs of procreation and generally undermining baby making, [but[ the facts are to the contrary. Evidence from elephants to rodents to humans shows that masturbating is—counterintuitively—an excellent way to make healthy babies, and lots of them.
The always tasteful (even when talking about masturbation) Sharon Begley, on the scientific case for masturbation.
One of autism’s defining features is the inability to process even the most mundane social interactions. When police are involved, an autistic person’s anxiety level is likely to spike, triggering unnerving mannerisms or behaviors. The person may say nothing at all, appearing to ignore an officer’s commands. Or he may repeat back what somebody says to him, a form of communication medically known as echolalia. “You can imagine if a police officer comes up and says, ‘What’s your name?’ and the kid’s response is, ‘What’s your name?’ the police will figure he’s a smart aleck or he’s on drugs,” says Grossman. “Usually, the situation goes downhill from there.”
Newsweek/Nurture Shock Creativity Contest: Over on their Nurture Shock blog, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman are asking readers to take questions from the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking. One of the tasks is described below:

In this drawing task, participants start with an incomplete figure, often no more than a scribbled shape. They add to it, turning it into a complete image. Use the incomplete figures to make pictures. Try to make them unusual. They should tell as interesting and complete a story as possible. Give each picture a title.

Here, we’re looking for something a little different, namely, how creative can you be if you’re not constrained by a pencil and paper? Our challenge: Take the above image and make a new image, using any tools you wish. You can print out the image, draw on it, scan it back in and submit, here; you can open up the image in Photoshop and digitally alter it; you can incorporate it into a Flash movie, etc. We’re looking for originality above all. Send us your best efforts, and we’ll publish them here and on Newsweek.com. 
 

Newsweek/Nurture Shock Creativity Contest: Over on their Nurture Shock blog, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman are asking readers to take questions from the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking. One of the tasks is described below:

In this drawing task, participants start with an incomplete figure, often no more than a scribbled shape. They add to it, turning it into a complete image. Use the incomplete figures to make pictures. Try to make them unusual. They should tell as interesting and complete a story as possible. Give each picture a title.

Here, we’re looking for something a little different, namely, how creative can you be if you’re not constrained by a pencil and paper? Our challenge: Take the above image and make a new image, using any tools you wish. You can print out the image, draw on it, scan it back in and submit, here; you can open up the image in Photoshop and digitally alter it; you can incorporate it into a Flash movie, etc. We’re looking for originality above all. Send us your best efforts, and we’ll publish them here and on Newsweek.com. 

 

As 5-year-olds, the children who had been spanked were more likely than the nonspanked to be defiant, demand immediate satisfaction of their wants and needs, become frustrated easily, have temper tantrums and lash out physically against other people or animals. The reason for this may be that spanking sets up a loop of bad behavior. Corporal punishment instills fear rather than understanding. Even if children stop tantrums when spanked, that doesn’t mean they get why they shouldn’t have been acting up in the first place. What’s more, spanking sets a bad example, teaching children that aggressive behavior is a solution to their parents’ problems.

The Long-Term Effects of Spanking - TIME (via apsies)

Hmm. Does this mean the University of Minnesota Spankological Protocol is no longer considered effective?