Posts tagged tech
zoeschlanger:

The Earth is Moving, And It’s Our Fault
Oklahoma has had more earthquakes this year than California. States are rumbling that barely did before. It’s becoming clear that humans are causing quakes through fracking-related injection wells, but plenty of people aren’t convinced.
The Earth, and the science of how everything works, is so big. We are so minute,” one Oklahoma state representative tells me. “For us to think that we have so much to do with these things is almost ludicrous.
And yet, injection-induced quakes are real. Why are we—at the level of our politics and at the level of our individual imaginations—unable to face this? 
As one USGS scientist puts it, “We’re kind of doing an experiment that we’ve never done before.”

zoeschlanger:

The Earth is Moving, And It’s Our Fault

Oklahoma has had more earthquakes this year than California. States are rumbling that barely did before. It’s becoming clear that humans are causing quakes through fracking-related injection wells, but plenty of people aren’t convinced.

The Earth, and the science of how everything works, is so big. We are so minute,” one Oklahoma state representative tells me. “For us to think that we have so much to do with these things is almost ludicrous.

And yet, injection-induced quakes are real. Why are we—at the level of our politics and at the level of our individual imaginations—unable to face this? 

As one USGS scientist puts it, “We’re kind of doing an experiment that we’ve never done before.”

One sunny day in March, Gagan Biyani, the young and hugely ambitious CEO of Sprig—a company so new you probably have never heard of it—stepped into the main conference room at 2550 Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California. Here, inside this nondescript Silicon Valley office, everything was about to change for Biyani, and his small company.
He was here to pitch his business plan to Greylock Partners. The room is ordinary—a white board, table, some chairs—but through the eyes of a fledgling CEO, it becomes transformed.
“Coming in, the first person I see is Reid, right?… And then David is over here; Aneel is there,” Biyani says breathlessly. “It was the biggest moment of my life.”
Gathered here on that day were some of the most powerful venture capitalists in the valley: David Sze, Aneel Bhusri, Reid Hoffman and every other partner at Greylock.
These are the guys who backed Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pandora, Dropbox, Airbnb—at a time when they were not much bigger than Sprig. For a striving founder of a startup, pitching your business plan here is a bit like being a rookie pitcher stepping onto the mound at Yankee Stadium—with Babe Ruth walking up to the plate.
Out of thousands of business plans Greylock sees each year, only 20 or so make it to a full partnership meeting. Of those, only half get funded. Biyani was determined to show that Sprig was worthy. But more than just his shot at the big leagues, what Biyani got that day was an up-close look at how Greylock picks its bets.
How Greylock Partners Finds the Next Facebook

One sunny day in March, Gagan Biyani, the young and hugely ambitious CEO of Sprig—a company so new you probably have never heard of it—stepped into the main conference room at 2550 Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California. Here, inside this nondescript Silicon Valley office, everything was about to change for Biyani, and his small company.

He was here to pitch his business plan to Greylock Partners. The room is ordinary—a white board, table, some chairs—but through the eyes of a fledgling CEO, it becomes transformed.

“Coming in, the first person I see is Reid, right?… And then David is over here; Aneel is there,” Biyani says breathlessly. “It was the biggest moment of my life.”

Gathered here on that day were some of the most powerful venture capitalists in the valley: David Sze, Aneel Bhusri, Reid Hoffman and every other partner at Greylock.

These are the guys who backed Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pandora, Dropbox, Airbnb—at a time when they were not much bigger than Sprig. For a striving founder of a startup, pitching your business plan here is a bit like being a rookie pitcher stepping onto the mound at Yankee Stadium—with Babe Ruth walking up to the plate.

Out of thousands of business plans Greylock sees each year, only 20 or so make it to a full partnership meeting. Of those, only half get funded. Biyani was determined to show that Sprig was worthy. But more than just his shot at the big leagues, what Biyani got that day was an up-close look at how Greylock picks its bets.

How Greylock Partners Finds the Next Facebook

lainnafader:

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet. 

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

lainnafader:

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet.

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

"A fugitive doesn’t need a suitcase full of cash to survive on the lam. He just needs a thumbdrive full of bitcoins."

So what are bitcoins, and how are they funding the escape of Edward Snowden? Read it here.

nwkarchivist:

Apple’s Macintosh PC Introduced On This Day In 1984
Newsweek January 30, 1984

This probably blew some minds back then: ”To remove an unwanted file, for example, one uses the mouse to drag an icon of a tiny file folder across the screen to an image of a garbage can; to erase the file, one uses the mouse to point to a command to “Empty Trash.” 

nwkarchivist:

Apple’s Macintosh PC Introduced On This Day In 1984

Newsweek January 30, 1984

This probably blew some minds back then: ”To remove an unwanted file, for example, one uses the mouse to drag an icon of a tiny file folder across the screen to an image of a garbage can; to erase the file, one uses the mouse to point to a command to “Empty Trash.” 

Another look at Syria’s web traffic drop-off, from Google, which reports: “All Google services inaccesible.” 

Another look at Syria’s web traffic drop-off, from Google, which reports: “All Google services inaccesible.” 

parislemon:

Well played, Facebook. Glad to see something potentially massive come out of the Karma deal.

This is actually a pretty big deal. (Note: Don’t go running off to your Facebooks just yet. It’s only being tested with 1% of the user-base at this point. We are the 99%.)

parislemon:

Well played, Facebook. Glad to see something potentially massive come out of the Karma deal.

This is actually a pretty big deal. (Note: Don’t go running off to your Facebooks just yet. It’s only being tested with 1% of the user-base at this point. We are the 99%.)