Posts tagged tv
Are you legendary on LinkedIn, a prodigy on Pinterest, talented on Twitter and fabulous on Facebook? If your friends ask you to “teach them Twitter” and their jaws drop when you’re done, we want YOU!
We’re not sure what’s going on but this appears to be a listing for social media stars to come live in a mansion in Miami and show their stuff help what is happening.
nwkarchivist:

RIP, James Gandolfini

Gandolfini’s astonishing turn as Tony Soprano has made him TV’s most unassuming superstar, as well as one of its more improbable sex symbols—a balding, barrel-chested, 260-pound hunk of burning love. (“He’s a stud,” says Gore Verbinski, who directed Gandolfini and Roberts in “The Mexican.” “Women go crazy for this guy. I think it’s a documented fact.”) Financially, fame’s rewards have been unequivocal. The former character actor reportedly signed a two-year, $10 million deal with HBO last fall, and is now asking $6 million a movie. But personally? Fame? “He’s not thrilled about it,” says costar Edie Falco. “He’s a very quiet, shy person. He keeps saying, ‘I’m not all that interesting,’ which I happen to disagree with.”

Newsweek  April 2, 2001

nwkarchivist:

RIP, James Gandolfini

Gandolfini’s astonishing turn as Tony Soprano has made him TV’s most unassuming superstar, as well as one of its more improbable sex symbols—a balding, barrel-chested, 260-pound hunk of burning love. (“He’s a stud,” says Gore Verbinski, who directed Gandolfini and Roberts in “The Mexican.” “Women go crazy for this guy. I think it’s a documented fact.”) Financially, fame’s rewards have been unequivocal. The former character actor reportedly signed a two-year, $10 million deal with HBO last fall, and is now asking $6 million a movie. But personally? Fame? “He’s not thrilled about it,” says costar Edie Falco. “He’s a very quiet, shy person. He keeps saying, ‘I’m not all that interesting,’ which I happen to disagree with.”

Newsweek  April 2, 2001

Spoiler alert: just 59 seconds into Sunday’s sixth-season premiere of True Blood, you’ll see the first flash of ass. (It’s Bill’s, it’s brief, and it’s covered in gory plasma.) Wait 19 minutes and there’s a handful of female werewolves standing full-frontal naked after turning back into humans. If you endure 36 minutes of the season opener, you’ll be rewarded with a threesome between a very naked Alcide (Joe Manganiello), his equally exposed girlfriend Rikki (Kelly Overton), and an unidentified third (also nude) werewolf.
Is sex the only reason you’re still watching True Blood?

"I hope I don’t get killed by the studio for giving too much away," Sorkin said, “but this entire movie is going to be three scenes, and three scenes only, that all take place in real time.”

Knowing as little as I do now, which is very little, what I see on the news, read in the paper, I think it’s a great example. Gen Petraeus plainly is a hero in the classic definition—not mine—a physical hero. He puts himself in harm’s way, he’s led men, won battles, protected us. But in a Shakespearean twist, he made a terrible mistake. He made a very human mistake. That is what at least in the short-term he’ll be known for. There’s some evidence that people who have done that can be rehabilitated [ed: cites Bill Clinton], so frankly it’s a story I would love to take on. Unfortunately season 2 of The Newsroom, which began shooting this week, our timeline literally ends the day before the Petraeus story broke, and I can’t include it. Otherwise, I would go there.
Aaron Sorkin when asked by Tina Brown how he would create the character of General Petraeus—and if he’ll cover the scandal on Newsroom. (Spoiler: He won’t.)
You can safely assume that my bowels were beginning to twitch slightly about what was going to happen.
Piers Morgan in one interview with investigators shortly after the government announced an investigation into a stock-tipping scandal centered on the tabloid he edited, The Daily Mirror. We got our hands on a bunch of documents that surfaced this quote (and many more!).