Posts tagged tv
Enough ladies. I get it. You have periods.
Two and a Half Men co-creator Lee Aronsohn tells THR he doesn’t much care for lady-centric sitcoms.
Lloyd Grove just pre-taped a segment that will air on Good Morning America tomorrow morning on the reopening of the Natalie Wood trial. (We used Diptic iPhone app for the shots).

Lloyd Grove just pre-taped a segment that will air on Good Morning America tomorrow morning on the reopening of the Natalie Wood trial. (We used Diptic iPhone app for the shots).

popculturebrain:

topherchris:

sesamestreet:

We lost Gordon.  Can you help us find him?  (Seriously.)

Here’s the story, and we’re collecting info on our website, too.

Sesame Street’s debuted 42 years ago today. But like most other TV shows, we had a test pilot. We created it in the summer of 1969, just a few months before the first episode aired. The actor who played Gordon on the show, pictured on the above-linked page (or if you that page goes down, here’s an imgur link, was replaced by an actor named Matt Robinson (who, by the way, is Holly Robinson Peete’s father).

Two years ago, we put together a huge anthology of our then-40 year history… and realized that we do not know who played Gordon in the test pilot. We’ve asked everyone we could think of — actors, actresses, and puppeteers who have been on the show since its inception; Sesame Workshop’s founder, Joan Ganz Cooney; and of course, dug through seemingly endless boxes of documents and photos.

Any clue would be great, even if it’s seemingly esoteric or mundane. You can email it to us at wheresgordon@sesameworkshop.org with any clues.

Oh, and one other thing: Here’s a clip of our mystery Gordon from that test pilot, above. And yes, Bert and Ernie look a little different than they do nowadays, but then again, Oscar used to be orange.

Sesame Street needs the internet’s help.

This is incredibly interesting. Help find him!

Newsweek wishes it lived on Sesame Street in the 1970’s. Everybody…dance.

I worry (as someone who was an adult in the 1960s) that young people will see The Playboy Club and think that this is what life was like back then and that Hefner, as he also says in his weird, creepy voice-over, was in fact “changing the world, one Bunny at a time.”

So I would like to say this:

1. Trust me, no one wanted to be a Bunny.

2. A Bunny’s life was essentially that of an underpaid waitress forced to wear a tight costume.

3. Playboy did not change the world.

Nora Ephron, in this week’s Newsweek, on the premiere of NBC’s The Playboy Club.