Posts tagged vintage newsweek

June 6, 1977

Newsweek’s first cover on gay rights, featuring a fiery Anita Bryant, documented how the Florida Citrus Commission spokeswoman (and former Miss Oklahoma) was mobilizing what was described as a “somewhat bizarre but deadly serious battle over gay rights.”

Bryant, of course, would later take a banana cream pie in the face. (“Well at least it’s a fruit pie,” she exclaimed.)

And thirty-four years to the month later, New York would become the sixth and largest state to legalize gay marriage.

June 6, 1977

Newsweek’s first cover on gay rights, featuring a fiery Anita Bryant, documented how the Florida Citrus Commission spokeswoman (and former Miss Oklahoma) was mobilizing what was described as a “somewhat bizarre but deadly serious battle over gay rights.”

Bryant, of course, would later take a banana cream pie in the face. (“Well at least it’s a fruit pie,” she exclaimed.)

And thirty-four years to the month later, New York would become the sixth and largest state to legalize gay marriage.

pleasedtomeetya:

I’m not sure why I’m so fascinated by this cover from mid-sixties Newsweek about teenagers, but I am.

OMG: The Teens! This has apparently been sitting in our drafts for about 8 months now. Hot.

pleasedtomeetya:

I’m not sure why I’m so fascinated by this cover from mid-sixties Newsweek about teenagers, but I am.

OMG: The Teens! This has apparently been sitting in our drafts for about 8 months now. Hot.

On International Women’s Day, a quick look at Newsweek of past—back when the concept of “Young Wives With Brains” warranted a cover story. Fifty years later, We tracked down one of the women featured in that original piece.
On suburban housewivery. “Being a mother and a housewife was an enormously challenging job, but it could be quite lonesome. Sure, we ran big houses, big budgets, active lives, but it wasn’t intellectually as challenging.”
On education. “After college, I applied to Columbia Law School, and was planning to go. But when I met with the dean and told him I wanted to work with affordable housing, he said, ‘You don’t need a law degree for that.’ I think the feeling was, ‘Why take up a man’s spot?’”
Also: see our gallery of Women’s History on Newsweek covers.

On International Women’s Day, a quick look at Newsweek of past—back when the concept of “Young Wives With Brains” warranted a cover story. Fifty years later, We tracked down one of the women featured in that original piece.

On suburban housewivery. “Being a mother and a housewife was an enormously challenging job, but it could be quite lonesome. Sure, we ran big houses, big budgets, active lives, but it wasn’t intellectually as challenging.”

On education. “After college, I applied to Columbia Law School, and was planning to go. But when I met with the dean and told him I wanted to work with affordable housing, he said, ‘You don’t need a law degree for that.’ I think the feeling was, ‘Why take up a man’s spot?’”

Also: see our gallery of Women’s History on Newsweek covers.

In honor of yesterday’s archival gem, a few more choice masculinity covers from the NEWSWEEK library (which is currently a very big stack of boxes; thank you to our research dept for digging these up). And ladies, we’ve got you covered: you can find an equally-amazing gallery of women on vintage NEWSWEEK covers here. Please note slide #6, which is possibly the best NEWSWEEK cover of all time. In fact, we regularly try to recreate that look while skipping around the office.
ZoomInfo
In honor of yesterday’s archival gem, a few more choice masculinity covers from the NEWSWEEK library (which is currently a very big stack of boxes; thank you to our research dept for digging these up). And ladies, we’ve got you covered: you can find an equally-amazing gallery of women on vintage NEWSWEEK covers here. Please note slide #6, which is possibly the best NEWSWEEK cover of all time. In fact, we regularly try to recreate that look while skipping around the office.
ZoomInfo
In honor of yesterday’s archival gem, a few more choice masculinity covers from the NEWSWEEK library (which is currently a very big stack of boxes; thank you to our research dept for digging these up). And ladies, we’ve got you covered: you can find an equally-amazing gallery of women on vintage NEWSWEEK covers here. Please note slide #6, which is possibly the best NEWSWEEK cover of all time. In fact, we regularly try to recreate that look while skipping around the office.
ZoomInfo

In honor of yesterday’s archival gem, a few more choice masculinity covers from the NEWSWEEK library (which is currently a very big stack of boxes; thank you to our research dept for digging these up). And ladies, we’ve got you covered: you can find an equally-amazing gallery of women on vintage NEWSWEEK covers here. Please note slide #6, which is possibly the best NEWSWEEK cover of all time. In fact, we regularly try to recreate that look while skipping around the office.

Oh no! This wasn’t showing up in our last post. And clearly, it needs to be seen. Trying again.
UPDATING WITH CAPTION (because we just dug that shit out of the archives for a full read):
In what is perhaps our favorite NEWSWEEK man cover, “Male Plumage ‘68” describes “the once securely buttoned-down fortress of male fashion under heavy siege.” Men from New York to San Francisco, the article claims—influenced by the Beatles, the hippies and student revolt, among other things—were breaking loose from sartorial regimentation and wandering off into a bizarre world of perfumes and hairstylists; wrapping themselves in form-fitting suits of every shade and fabric; hanging pendants and beads from their necks. To sum it up, the late Yves St. Laurent—himself just delving into male fashion at the time—put it this way: “Today it’s the great idea of liberty.”
Um, yes.

Oh no! This wasn’t showing up in our last post. And clearly, it needs to be seen. Trying again.

UPDATING WITH CAPTION (because we just dug that shit out of the archives for a full read):

In what is perhaps our favorite NEWSWEEK man cover, “Male Plumage ‘68” describes “the once securely buttoned-down fortress of male fashion under heavy siege.” Men from New York to San Francisco, the article claims—influenced by the Beatles, the hippies and student revolt, among other things—were breaking loose from sartorial regimentation and wandering off into a bizarre world of perfumes and hairstylists; wrapping themselves in form-fitting suits of every shade and fabric; hanging pendants and beads from their necks. To sum it up, the late Yves St. Laurent—himself just delving into male fashion at the time—put it this way: “Today it’s the great idea of liberty.”

Um, yes.