Posts tagged women
It began hundreds of years ago, deep in the Albanian Alps—an unusual tradition where women, with limited options in life, took the oath of the burrnesha. A pledge to live as a man. To dress like a man, to work like a man, to assume the burdens and the liberties of a man. 

But these freedoms came with a price: The burrneshas also made a pledge of lifelong celibacy. Today these sworn virgins live on, but their numbers have dwindled. Many Albanians don’t even know they exist. 

What happens when the society that created you no longer needs you? And how do you live in the meantime? 

The Oath of the Burrnesha: Women Living as Men in the Albanian Alps

It began hundreds of years ago, deep in the Albanian Alps—an unusual tradition where women, with limited options in life, took the oath of the burrnesha. A pledge to live as a man. To dress like a man, to work like a man, to assume the burdens and the liberties of a man.

But these freedoms came with a price: The burrneshas also made a pledge of lifelong celibacy. Today these sworn virgins live on, but their numbers have dwindled. Many Albanians don’t even know they exist.

What happens when the society that created you no longer needs you? And how do you live in the meantime?

The Oath of the Burrnesha: Women Living as Men in the Albanian Alps

About 40 miles north of the Irvine headquarters of In‑N‑Out Burger, the noonday sun makes the gritty industrial landscape of Baldwin Park simmer like a Double-Double fresh off the grill. 

Hulking tractor-trailers emblazoned with the fast-food chain’s familiar logo navigate the narrow asphalt arteries of a sprawling warehouse complex that serves as In‑N‑Out’s distribution center, a short distance from the spot where Harry and Esther Snyder opened their long-since-shuttered first stand back in 1948. 

A tour bus contingent of Asian visitors, apparently fresh from lunch at an In‑N‑Out on the edge of the complex, is now milling about in front of the In‑N‑Out University training center, snapping photos and perusing the classic car-themed memorabilia in the company gift store. 

The visitors’ fascination with a regional hamburger chain is no surprise, considering that over the years, In‑N‑Out—whose freshly-made, premium burgers are famously craved by Hollywood luminaries and rock stars—has become an enduring part of California’s mystique. 

The sightseers don’t seem to notice an SUV pulling up. It contains a trim, athletic blonde in a chic black-on-black ensemble accessorized by a stylishly chunky rose-gold Michael Kors wristwatch and a necklace with a glittering Star of David pendant. 

She is just 31, but Bloomberg News recently valued the company she controls at $1.1 billion, making her the youngest woman with a 10-digit net worth in America. Forbes estimates her wealth at $500 million. (via Meet Lynsi Snyder, president of In-N-Out)

About 40 miles north of the Irvine headquarters of In‑N‑Out Burger, the noonday sun makes the gritty industrial landscape of Baldwin Park simmer like a Double-Double fresh off the grill.

Hulking tractor-trailers emblazoned with the fast-food chain’s familiar logo navigate the narrow asphalt arteries of a sprawling warehouse complex that serves as In‑N‑Out’s distribution center, a short distance from the spot where Harry and Esther Snyder opened their long-since-shuttered first stand back in 1948.

A tour bus contingent of Asian visitors, apparently fresh from lunch at an In‑N‑Out on the edge of the complex, is now milling about in front of the In‑N‑Out University training center, snapping photos and perusing the classic car-themed memorabilia in the company gift store.

The visitors’ fascination with a regional hamburger chain is no surprise, considering that over the years, In‑N‑Out—whose freshly-made, premium burgers are famously craved by Hollywood luminaries and rock stars—has become an enduring part of California’s mystique.

The sightseers don’t seem to notice an SUV pulling up. It contains a trim, athletic blonde in a chic black-on-black ensemble accessorized by a stylishly chunky rose-gold Michael Kors wristwatch and a necklace with a glittering Star of David pendant.

She is just 31, but Bloomberg News recently valued the company she controls at $1.1 billion, making her the youngest woman with a 10-digit net worth in America. Forbes estimates her wealth at $500 million. (via Meet Lynsi Snyder, president of In-N-Out)

Last week, Newsweek interviewed Tamara Green, one of 13 women who accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them in a civil lawsuit brought by Andrea Constand in 2004, and settled under undisclosed terms in 2006. 

Now, a second woman is speaking out: Barbara Bowman, a 46-year-old artist who says Cosby took her under his wing in the late ‘80s, when she was a teenager — and repeatedly emotionally and physically abused her. Both Bowman and Green joined the 2004 lawsuit as witnesses after hearing about it on television; neither had anything to gain financially, as the statute of limitations had expired for both of them. 

Barbara Bowman Speaks About Bill Cosby Sexual Abuse Allegations

Last week, Newsweek interviewed Tamara Green, one of 13 women who accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them in a civil lawsuit brought by Andrea Constand in 2004, and settled under undisclosed terms in 2006.

Now, a second woman is speaking out: Barbara Bowman, a 46-year-old artist who says Cosby took her under his wing in the late ‘80s, when she was a teenager — and repeatedly emotionally and physically abused her. Both Bowman and Green joined the 2004 lawsuit as witnesses after hearing about it on television; neither had anything to gain financially, as the statute of limitations had expired for both of them.

Barbara Bowman Speaks About Bill Cosby Sexual Abuse Allegations

Multiple women have accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them. Cosby has repeatedly denied the allegations, and settled a 2006 lawsuit that included 13 accusers.
Newsweek spoke to one of those women, Tamara Green, a former trial attorney now living in Southern California who says Cosby assaulted her in the 1970s; she only came forward in 2005, after hearing about some of his other alleged victims. Green talked candidly about how her confession was a “career-ender,” and about how difficult it can be for women who accuse powerful men of sexual assault. 

Multiple women have accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them. Cosby has repeatedly denied the allegations, and settled a 2006 lawsuit that included 13 accusers.

Newsweek spoke to one of those women, Tamara Green, a former trial attorney now living in Southern California who says Cosby assaulted her in the 1970s; she only came forward in 2005, after hearing about some of his other alleged victims. Green talked candidly about how her confession was a “career-ender,” and about how difficult it can be for women who accuse powerful men of sexual assault. 

What do the “black widow” Islamist suicide bombers reported to be headed for the Winter Olympics in Sochi look like? I think back to May 2012 when a series of Islamist bombings in Makhachkala, the capital of Dagestan, left 13 dead and over 130 injured. 

Two weeks later, two suspected terrorists were cornered in a house by security forces and, after the intervention of protesters, some women carrying babies were allowed to leave the premises. The women were angry. One, who claimed both her brothers had been killed by Russian forces, said to me, “I am ready to do anything. I can blow myself up, together with all these nonbelievers.” 

This week I was informed by an official in Makhachkala that the furious woman I spoke to was none other than Ruzana Ibragimova, one of the black widows desperately being sought by police after warning they had intelligence she was on her way to bomb the Winter Olympics in Sochi. 

Police suspect Ibragimova is already in the Olympic city, having arrived from from Dagestan earlier this month. I also met recently another woman closely associated with Islamist terrorism, “Aisha” - not her real name - a niece of Doku Umarov, the leading Chechen terrorist who has promised to wage war against the Kremlin until his country is free of Moscow rule. Russians call him “the Russian Osama bin Laden.” 

Umarov has been seen so rarely in the past decade, the authorities have pronounced him dead eight times. I asked Aisha when she had last seen him. It was in a mosque in the Ingush city of Nazran more than 10 years ago, in the midst of the second Chechen war, she said. (MORE: I Met the Black Widow Suicide Bomber - Newsweek)

What do the “black widow” Islamist suicide bombers reported to be headed for the Winter Olympics in Sochi look like? I think back to May 2012 when a series of Islamist bombings in Makhachkala, the capital of Dagestan, left 13 dead and over 130 injured.

Two weeks later, two suspected terrorists were cornered in a house by security forces and, after the intervention of protesters, some women carrying babies were allowed to leave the premises. The women were angry. One, who claimed both her brothers had been killed by Russian forces, said to me, “I am ready to do anything. I can blow myself up, together with all these nonbelievers.”

This week I was informed by an official in Makhachkala that the furious woman I spoke to was none other than Ruzana Ibragimova, one of the black widows desperately being sought by police after warning they had intelligence she was on her way to bomb the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

Police suspect Ibragimova is already in the Olympic city, having arrived from from Dagestan earlier this month. I also met recently another woman closely associated with Islamist terrorism, “Aisha” - not her real name - a niece of Doku Umarov, the leading Chechen terrorist who has promised to wage war against the Kremlin until his country is free of Moscow rule. Russians call him “the Russian Osama bin Laden.”

Umarov has been seen so rarely in the past decade, the authorities have pronounced him dead eight times. I asked Aisha when she had last seen him. It was in a mosque in the Ingush city of Nazran more than 10 years ago, in the midst of the second Chechen war, she said. (MORE: I Met the Black Widow Suicide Bomber - Newsweek)

Internet Harassment Of Women: When Haters Do More Than Just Hatehttp://www.npr.org/2014/01/08/260757625/internet-harassment-of-women-when-haters-do-more-than-just-hate

// - This comment from Kate Gardiner Many of our contributors - and half of our staffers - are women. In recent days, criticism of Janine di Giovanni's controversial Fall of France piece has shifted from fact-related critique (our response) to ad hominem on Twitter and other social media sites.

Amanda Hess, and the subsequent NPR story shine some light on why that happens and how journalists and the general public can support women writing and working online. //

karnythia:

anglofilles:

Amanda Hess, Mikki Kendall, and Bridget Johnson discuss harassment and threats against women who have the ovaries to be women on the internet on Tell Me More.

Oh hey that’s me!

(via note-a-bear)

Is America Ready for a Female President—or Just President Hillary?

Pollsters Jeffrey Liszt and Lisa Grove shared that in a recent survey of voters in battleground states, a whopping 72% “believe that it is likely that our next president will be a woman.” This information, of course, makes sense only in a political landscape featuring Hillary. It may be that nearly three-quarters of voters are ready (perhaps even eager) to elevate a generic woman to the Big Chair. But, absent Hillary, no way 72% of any group would consider such an outcome likely in the very next election.

Agree with that, tumblr?

Is America Ready for a Female President—or Just President Hillary?

Pollsters Jeffrey Liszt and Lisa Grove shared that in a recent survey of voters in battleground states, a whopping 72% “believe that it is likely that our next president will be a woman.” This information, of course, makes sense only in a political landscape featuring Hillary. It may be that nearly three-quarters of voters are ready (perhaps even eager) to elevate a generic woman to the Big Chair. But, absent Hillary, no way 72% of any group would consider such an outcome likely in the very next election.

Agree with that, tumblr?

Can Women Succeed Without A Mentor? 

Asks Peggy Drexler:

Studies show that historically women have reported a more difficult time finding mentors than men do, which has led to a number of mentoring networks aimed specifically at connecting women with female mentors. In a 2010 World Economic Forum report on corporate practices for gender diversity in 20 countries, 59 percent of the companies surveyed said they offer internally led mentoring and networking programs, and 28 percent said they have women-specific programs. But with women squarely positioned as the driving force behind U.S. labor force growth—projected to account for 51 percent of the increase in total growth through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor—what will happen when there aren’t enough mentors to go around? A 2011 report by McKinsey Research pointed out that women are claiming 53 percent of entry-level management jobs, but that after that, the numbers drop: to 37 percent for mid-managers, and even lower, to 26 percent, for vice presidents and up.

Dr. Tererai Trent, Tina Brown, Oprah Winfrey, & Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala at Women in the World

Dr. Tererai Trent, Tina Brown, Oprah Winfrey, & Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala at Women in the World