Posts tagged women
A woman who was raped by her friend in India, and who is now dealing with a case in the High Court, is telling her story to the Women in the World audience. The lights are out. Her back is to the audience. And we don’t know her name. This is what the livestream looks like at the moment. She is doing this as a precautionary measure fearing backlash from her own people. Such a brave woman.

A woman who was raped by her friend in India, and who is now dealing with a case in the High Court, is telling her story to the Women in the World audience. The lights are out. Her back is to the audience. And we don’t know her name. This is what the livestream looks like at the moment. She is doing this as a precautionary measure fearing backlash from her own people. Such a brave woman.

South Africa needs to restore the promise of freedom… all of us who fought for this freedom cannot hide from the truth that in two decades since apartheid we have not (seen the benefits) for women… Every 34 seconds a woman is raped in South Africa. It’s not a cultural issue, it’s a straying of the values and respect of human dignity.

Dr. Mamphela Ramphele

has announced the creation of a new political party, Agad, and is running to be South Africa’s first female president. God speed.

(via smallgirls)

Dr. Mamphela Ramphele being interviewed by Charlie Rose on stage at Women in the World. She’s campaigning to be South Africa’s first president. Watch live here.

Dr. Mamphela Ramphele being interviewed by Charlie Rose on stage at Women in the World. She’s campaigning to be South Africa’s first president. Watch live here.

picturedept:

Women Seeing WomenInternational Women’s Day, March 8
“Mallarme said that everything in the world exists in order to end in a book. Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” —Susan Sontag
Hanna Putz (featured in the first slide of this preview) nurtured her awareness as a photographer, starting out as a model in front of the camera. Echoing Sontag’s sentiment, she has looked for ways to shake up the “permanent posing” of her generation. In creating portraits of friends who had recently given birth to their first children, she noticed a remarkable shift in awareness. “Their attention is mainly on their child, and [they] are also in some kind of a transitional phase, as they are adjusting to the new role that has just been given to them,” said Putz in an interview with BJP.
On the occasion of International Women’s Day, Newsweek & The Daily Beast features work from 15 talented women who represent a range of remarkable awareness as lovers, daughters, mothers, and foremost artists.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Women Seeing WomenInternational Women’s Day, March 8
“Mallarme said that everything in the world exists in order to end in a book. Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” —Susan Sontag
Hanna Putz (featured in the first slide of this preview) nurtured her awareness as a photographer, starting out as a model in front of the camera. Echoing Sontag’s sentiment, she has looked for ways to shake up the “permanent posing” of her generation. In creating portraits of friends who had recently given birth to their first children, she noticed a remarkable shift in awareness. “Their attention is mainly on their child, and [they] are also in some kind of a transitional phase, as they are adjusting to the new role that has just been given to them,” said Putz in an interview with BJP.
On the occasion of International Women’s Day, Newsweek & The Daily Beast features work from 15 talented women who represent a range of remarkable awareness as lovers, daughters, mothers, and foremost artists.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Women Seeing WomenInternational Women’s Day, March 8
“Mallarme said that everything in the world exists in order to end in a book. Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” —Susan Sontag
Hanna Putz (featured in the first slide of this preview) nurtured her awareness as a photographer, starting out as a model in front of the camera. Echoing Sontag’s sentiment, she has looked for ways to shake up the “permanent posing” of her generation. In creating portraits of friends who had recently given birth to their first children, she noticed a remarkable shift in awareness. “Their attention is mainly on their child, and [they] are also in some kind of a transitional phase, as they are adjusting to the new role that has just been given to them,” said Putz in an interview with BJP.
On the occasion of International Women’s Day, Newsweek & The Daily Beast features work from 15 talented women who represent a range of remarkable awareness as lovers, daughters, mothers, and foremost artists.
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

Women Seeing WomenInternational Women’s Day, March 8
“Mallarme said that everything in the world exists in order to end in a book. Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” —Susan Sontag
Hanna Putz (featured in the first slide of this preview) nurtured her awareness as a photographer, starting out as a model in front of the camera. Echoing Sontag’s sentiment, she has looked for ways to shake up the “permanent posing” of her generation. In creating portraits of friends who had recently given birth to their first children, she noticed a remarkable shift in awareness. “Their attention is mainly on their child, and [they] are also in some kind of a transitional phase, as they are adjusting to the new role that has just been given to them,” said Putz in an interview with BJP.
On the occasion of International Women’s Day, Newsweek & The Daily Beast features work from 15 talented women who represent a range of remarkable awareness as lovers, daughters, mothers, and foremost artists.
ZoomInfo

picturedept:

Women Seeing Women
International Women’s Day, March 8

“Mallarme said that everything in the world exists in order to end in a book. Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” —Susan Sontag

Hanna Putz (featured in the first slide of this preview) nurtured her awareness as a photographer, starting out as a model in front of the camera. Echoing Sontag’s sentiment, she has looked for ways to shake up the “permanent posing” of her generation. In creating portraits of friends who had recently given birth to their first children, she noticed a remarkable shift in awareness. “Their attention is mainly on their child, and [they] are also in some kind of a transitional phase, as they are adjusting to the new role that has just been given to them,” said Putz in an interview with BJP.

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, Newsweek & The Daily Beast features work from 15 talented women who represent a range of remarkable awareness as lovers, daughters, mothers, and foremost artists.

pritheworld:

This cartoon is by the very talented Egyptian (female) political cartoonist Doaa Eladl. Egyptian women are organizing to call attention to sexual harassment which they say is reaching epidemic proportions.

pritheworld:

This cartoon is by the very talented Egyptian (female) political cartoonist Doaa Eladl. Egyptian women are organizing to call attention to sexual harassment which they say is reaching epidemic proportions.

(via poptech)

Women voters proved that politicians cannot threaten their rights with impunity. We don’t yet know the precise influence that issues like equal-pay legislation, abortion, and birth control had on the electorate. Women are more liberal than men on a whole range of issues, including the strength of the safety net, and would likely have broken for Obama even if reproductive rights had played less of a role in the race.
Michelle Goldberg writes that the influence women exercised on this year’s results goes beyond electing female representation
Republicans, you have a problem:

In Iowa, the 2008 gender gap was 5 points. This year it was 15. Ohio swung from a 2-point gender gap in 2008 to 10 points in 2012. Virginia saw a 5-point swing, from 2 points in ’08 to 7 this year. Florida went from a 1-point gender gap to a 7-point gap in 2012. The only swing state that didn’t see a significant gender gap this time around was Colorado.
The media treated the “War on Women” as being primarily about reproductive issues, but not so the Obama campaign. Team Obama knew that the issue that women cared about the most was the economy, and reminded women constantly that the hostility the GOP shows toward the government could leave single women in a perilous situation. Republicans ridiculed “The Life of Julia,” but it was a brilliant campaign outreach tactic that showed how a Romney administration would affect women in a way that left nothing to the imagination.
Adding to the alienation of women voters this year were deeply troubling comments from GOP Senate candidates about rape, a tirade by Rush Limbaugh calling a woman a slut for testifying about the availability of birth control, and so on. Yes, Bill Maher is a pig and says terrible things about women too, but voters don’t view him as a leader in the Democratic Party in the same way Limbaugh is viewed in the GOP.  Also unhelpful to the GOP cause is the constant insistence that there is no wage discrimination against women—a stance that led to the mocking of the Lily Ledbetter Act, a milquetoast measure protecting women from salary discrimination that any decent person should support.

Republicans, you have a problem:

In Iowa, the 2008 gender gap was 5 points. This year it was 15. Ohio swung from a 2-point gender gap in 2008 to 10 points in 2012. Virginia saw a 5-point swing, from 2 points in ’08 to 7 this year. Florida went from a 1-point gender gap to a 7-point gap in 2012. The only swing state that didn’t see a significant gender gap this time around was Colorado.

The media treated the “War on Women” as being primarily about reproductive issues, but not so the Obama campaign. Team Obama knew that the issue that women cared about the most was the economy, and reminded women constantly that the hostility the GOP shows toward the government could leave single women in a perilous situation. Republicans ridiculed “The Life of Julia,” but it was a brilliant campaign outreach tactic that showed how a Romney administration would affect women in a way that left nothing to the imagination.

Adding to the alienation of women voters this year were deeply troubling comments from GOP Senate candidates about rape, a tirade by Rush Limbaugh calling a woman a slut for testifying about the availability of birth control, and so on. Yes, Bill Maher is a pig and says terrible things about women too, but voters don’t view him as a leader in the Democratic Party in the same way Limbaugh is viewed in the GOP.  Also unhelpful to the GOP cause is the constant insistence that there is no wage discrimination against women—a stance that led to the mocking of the Lily Ledbetter Act, a milquetoast measure protecting women from salary discrimination that any decent person should support.

Rather than leaping with glee at the liberation that has befallen women since the 1960s, we are laboring instead under a double whammy of impossible expectations—the old-fashioned ones (to be good mothers and wives, impeccable housekeepers and blushing brides) and those wrought more recently (to be athletic, strong, sexually versatile, and wholly independent). The result? We have become a generation desperate to be perfect wives, mothers, and professionals—Tiger Moms who prepare organic quinoa each evening after waltzing home from the IPO in our Manolo Blahnik heels. Even worse, we somehow believe that we need to do all of this at once, and without any help.
Debora Spar, President of Barnard College, in a Newsweek story: Why Women Should Stop Trying to Be Perfect
This photo is from a gallery by Olivia Aurthur accompanying our feature that peers inside the secretive world of Saudi women.

In a kitchen in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, an abaya-clad woman shows her zebra-striped slippers. Some Saudi women like to have small bands of color or other decorative touches on the long, black garb that’s supposed to help them maintain modesty. Others say such ornamentation is improper because it attracts men’s attention.

The full story is absolutely worth a read.

This photo is from a gallery by Olivia Aurthur accompanying our feature that peers inside the secretive world of Saudi women.

In a kitchen in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, an abaya-clad woman shows her zebra-striped slippers. Some Saudi women like to have small bands of color or other decorative touches on the long, black garb that’s supposed to help them maintain modesty. Others say such ornamentation is improper because it attracts men’s attention.

The full story is absolutely worth a read.