Posts tagged writers
Gabriel García Márquez was interviewed in his studio/office located just behind his house in San Angel Inn, an old and lovely section, full of the spectacularly colorful flowers of Mexico City. 

The studio is a short walk from the main house. A low elongated building, it appears to have been originally designed as a guest house. Within, at one end, are a couch, two easy chairs, and a makeshift bar—a small white refrigerator with a supply of acqua minerale on top. 

The most striking feature of the room is a large blown-up photograph above the sofa of García Márquez alone, wearing a stylish cape and standing on some windswept vista looking somewhat like Anthony Quinn. García Márquez was sitting at his desk at the far end of the studio. 

He came to greet me, walking briskly with a light step. He is a solidly built man, only about five feet eight or nine in height, who looks like a good middleweight fighter—broad-chested, but perhaps a bit thin in the legs. He was dressed casually in corduroy slacks with a light turtleneck sweater and black leather boots. His hair is dark and curly brown and he wears a full mustache. 

The interview took place over the course of three late-afternoon meetings of roughly two hours each. Although his English is quite good, García Márquez spoke mostly in Spanish and his two sons shared the translating. 

When García Márquez speaks, his body often rocks back and forth. His hands too are often in motion making small but decisive gestures to emphasize a point, or to indicate a shift of direction in his thinking. 

He alternates between leaning forward towards his listener, and sitting far back with his legs crossed when speaking reflectively. 

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 69, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Gabriel García Márquez was interviewed in his studio/office located just behind his house in San Angel Inn, an old and lovely section, full of the spectacularly colorful flowers of Mexico City.

The studio is a short walk from the main house. A low elongated building, it appears to have been originally designed as a guest house. Within, at one end, are a couch, two easy chairs, and a makeshift bar—a small white refrigerator with a supply of acqua minerale on top.

The most striking feature of the room is a large blown-up photograph above the sofa of García Márquez alone, wearing a stylish cape and standing on some windswept vista looking somewhat like Anthony Quinn. García Márquez was sitting at his desk at the far end of the studio.

He came to greet me, walking briskly with a light step. He is a solidly built man, only about five feet eight or nine in height, who looks like a good middleweight fighter—broad-chested, but perhaps a bit thin in the legs. He was dressed casually in corduroy slacks with a light turtleneck sweater and black leather boots. His hair is dark and curly brown and he wears a full mustache.

The interview took place over the course of three late-afternoon meetings of roughly two hours each. Although his English is quite good, García Márquez spoke mostly in Spanish and his two sons shared the translating.

When García Márquez speaks, his body often rocks back and forth. His hands too are often in motion making small but decisive gestures to emphasize a point, or to indicate a shift of direction in his thinking.

He alternates between leaning forward towards his listener, and sitting far back with his legs crossed when speaking reflectively.

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 69, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Newsweek’s staff is comprised of 43.3% female reporters, writers and editors as of today. 
upworthy:

One Group Had A Hypothesis About Sexism. They Made A Bunch Of Pies To Prove It.
Every year, a group of volunteers does an old-fashioned tally: How many of the stories, articles, and reviews in major literary publications are by or about women authors? They turned their tick marks into pie charts, and the VIDA Count was born. The gender imbalance it reveals is so dramatic, there should probably be an episode of “Law & Order” about it. Here are just a few of the ickiest “pies.”
ZoomInfo
Newsweek’s staff is comprised of 43.3% female reporters, writers and editors as of today. 
upworthy:

One Group Had A Hypothesis About Sexism. They Made A Bunch Of Pies To Prove It.
Every year, a group of volunteers does an old-fashioned tally: How many of the stories, articles, and reviews in major literary publications are by or about women authors? They turned their tick marks into pie charts, and the VIDA Count was born. The gender imbalance it reveals is so dramatic, there should probably be an episode of “Law & Order” about it. Here are just a few of the ickiest “pies.”
ZoomInfo
Newsweek’s staff is comprised of 43.3% female reporters, writers and editors as of today. 
upworthy:

One Group Had A Hypothesis About Sexism. They Made A Bunch Of Pies To Prove It.
Every year, a group of volunteers does an old-fashioned tally: How many of the stories, articles, and reviews in major literary publications are by or about women authors? They turned their tick marks into pie charts, and the VIDA Count was born. The gender imbalance it reveals is so dramatic, there should probably be an episode of “Law & Order” about it. Here are just a few of the ickiest “pies.”
ZoomInfo
Newsweek’s staff is comprised of 43.3% female reporters, writers and editors as of today. 
upworthy:

One Group Had A Hypothesis About Sexism. They Made A Bunch Of Pies To Prove It.
Every year, a group of volunteers does an old-fashioned tally: How many of the stories, articles, and reviews in major literary publications are by or about women authors? They turned their tick marks into pie charts, and the VIDA Count was born. The gender imbalance it reveals is so dramatic, there should probably be an episode of “Law & Order” about it. Here are just a few of the ickiest “pies.”
ZoomInfo

Newsweek’s staff is comprised of 43.3% female reporters, writers and editors as of today. 

upworthy:

One Group Had A Hypothesis About Sexism. They Made A Bunch Of Pies To Prove It.

Every year, a group of volunteers does an old-fashioned tally: How many of the stories, articles, and reviews in major literary publications are by or about women authors? They turned their tick marks into pie charts, and the VIDA Count was born. The gender imbalance it reveals is so dramatic, there should probably be an episode of “Law & Order” about it. Here are just a few of the ickiest “pies.”

One day in late January, the novelist, n 1 editor, and now self-taught Marxist political economist Benjamin Kunkel left Buenos Aires and flew to Rio. 

He’d been living in Argentina more on than off since the recession hit, an enviably high-minded take-the-money-and-run expat in the frothy wake of his novel Indecision, and his travel schedule was like a con man’s, always shifting. 

In Rio, he met the leftist playwright Wallace Shawn and his girlfriend of 40 years, the short-story goddess Deborah Eisenberg, who were staging a one-night-only performance of Shawn’s The Designated Mourner for the benefit of Glenn Greenwald, the national-security-state crusader and Edward Snowden accomplice, who lives there. 

Not to benefit; for the benefit of. Greenwald couldn’t feel comfortable coming to New York to see the play, which describes the death of liberal culture at the hands of reactionary forces, so they took the entire Public Theater production to him—“A show of solidarity,” Shawn says. Kunkel calls it “a stunt.” But he says it lovingly, admiringly. “Maybe everything the left does is.” 

Benjamin Kunkel, Novelist Turned Intellectual — Vulture

One day in late January, the novelist, n 1 editor, and now self-taught Marxist political economist Benjamin Kunkel left Buenos Aires and flew to Rio.

He’d been living in Argentina more on than off since the recession hit, an enviably high-minded take-the-money-and-run expat in the frothy wake of his novel Indecision, and his travel schedule was like a con man’s, always shifting.

In Rio, he met the leftist playwright Wallace Shawn and his girlfriend of 40 years, the short-story goddess Deborah Eisenberg, who were staging a one-night-only performance of Shawn’s The Designated Mourner for the benefit of Glenn Greenwald, the national-security-state crusader and Edward Snowden accomplice, who lives there.

Not to benefit; for the benefit of. Greenwald couldn’t feel comfortable coming to New York to see the play, which describes the death of liberal culture at the hands of reactionary forces, so they took the entire Public Theater production to him—“A show of solidarity,” Shawn says. Kunkel calls it “a stunt.” But he says it lovingly, admiringly. “Maybe everything the left does is.”

Benjamin Kunkel, Novelist Turned Intellectual — Vulture